• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Montana study

Help Support Ranchers.net:

HAY MAKER

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2005
Messages
8,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Texas
September 16, 2005
Montana study shows strengths, weaknesses of ID technology

The Montana Beef Network, based at Montana State University, recently conducted three studies of current livestock ID technology. One of the studies involved a Montana market, and 200 calves born in the state. Here’s how it worked, and this is what they found:

The calves were divided into four groups, then tagged --- three groups at the owner’s ranch, and one at the market in Ramsey, Mont. The tags were the 15-digit radio frequency ID (RFID) electronic tag.

Research Andy Kellom said “our hypothesis” was that a market, where hundreds of calves are sold, “would be one of the hardest places to follow through” with tracking. Two types of tag scanners were used; one was stationary and built in the alley where the cattle would pass by; the other was a handheld scanner.

The researchers found that metal fences at the market interfered with the stationary alley scanners, and as a result, it read only 60 percent of the tags.

The handheld scanner read every ear tag – but calves had to be slowed down as they came through the alley. “We found out it wasn’t as easy as we thought,” Kellom said.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
It will be interesting to see what this will end up "costing" the industry...Besides the equipment ( computers, readers, RFID tags or devices, salebarn and corral remodeling, etc. etc.), the manpower ( hired inspectors) to do the inspections and transfer the data, but like this article points out the additional cost in time....

Has anyone seen any projected total costs which include not only setting up the system and infrastructure- but the actual day to day running cost?
because I'm sure just like brand inspections are today- that cost will be put back on the producer.....
 

Soapweed

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
16,257
Reaction score
42
Location
northern Nebraska Sandhills
You are right, OT, there will be a "cost" to the cow/calf operators if mandatory RFID comes about. I am against it. I am also against mandatory COOL for the same reason. COOL is just another cost to cow/calf producers where no benefits will be derived. If all USA beef has to have that label, it will mean nothing. It is just commodity beef. If mandatory RFID happens, it will be because of mandatory COOL. COOL is of no value without traceback. We will have cut off our nose to spite our face. Sometimes it's best if we don't get what we wish for. COOL is not a blessing in disguise. It is a boondoggle in disguise.

The value added cattle programs like South Dakota Premium Beef do have benefits. Hoops are jumped through by the producers, and the consumers know exactly what they are buying. They are willing to pay a premium. Consumers are not willing to pay a premium for simply getting USA beef. Some of those old Okie cattle don't taste all that great even though they were born, raised, fed and processed in the USA. Consumers are sure not willing to pay a premium to get to eat it.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Soapweed said:
You are right, OT, there will be a "cost" to the cow/calf operators if mandatory RFID comes about. I am against it. I am also against mandatory COOL for the same reason. COOL is just another cost to cow/calf producers where no benefits will be derived. If all USA beef has to have that label, it will mean nothing. It is just commodity beef. If mandatory RFID happens, it will be because of mandatory COOL. COOL is of no value without traceback. We will have cut off our nose to spite our face. Sometimes it's best if we don't get what we wish for. COOL is not a blessing in disguise. It is a boondoggle in disguise.

The value added cattle programs like South Dakota Premium Beef do have benefits. Hoops are jumped through by the producers, and the consumers know exactly what they are buying. They are willing to pay a premium. Consumers are not willing to pay a premium for simply getting USA beef. Some of those old Okie cattle don't taste all that great even though they were born, raised, fed and processed in the USA. Consumers are sure not willing to pay a premium to get to eat it.

Soap- I disagree...Cool and mandatory ID have nothing to do with each other- we could easily have either without the other....And with the current Homeland Security FDA laws going into effect all imported meat will have to be traceable and all retail outlets will have to have records and documentation on it if audited- so the cost is already there for COOL- except they still don't have to tell the consumer.... And all beef and cattle currently coming into the country is marked and/or segregated- but they still refuse to tell the consumer- It can't cost that much for a Product of Mexico sticker....

According to the Mandatory ID law your NCBA has pushed so strongly, the info will only be accessible by state or federal government if there is a health issue--FOR NO OTHER REASON- because of the privacy issue..... If you want records on your beef or for your calves to go into a branded beef program, you will still have to go thru a separate entity....
 

Tam

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
12,759
Reaction score
0
Location
Sask
And all beef and cattle currently coming into the country is marked and/or segregated- but they still refuse to tell the consumer-
So Canadian beef is labeled when it leaves Canada :shock: I thought it was our fault the US citizens didn't know what was Canadian beef. I would think if we wanted to ride your shirttails we wouldn't be labeling our beef so you would know where it really came from. :wink:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Tam said:
And all beef and cattle currently coming into the country is marked and/or segregated- but they still refuse to tell the consumer-
So Canadian beef is labeled when it leaves Canada :shock: I thought it was our fault the US citizens didn't know what was Canadian beef. I would think if we wanted to ride your shirttails we wouldn't be labeling our beef so you would know where it really came from. :wink:

Actually Tam- few consumers know they have eaten Canadian beef-it all has a USDA stamp on it when its sold down here so they think it is US beef...

Must be the US retailers and packers don't think it will sell if you tell people the truth, because they have paid big bucks to buy USDA inc., NCBA, and a Congress to keep the fraud of cutting off the Canadian markings and putting on the USDA stamp .........
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Manitoba_Rancher said:
Sure they do OT, they know that it comes from Canada if its tender and tasty. :wink:

I don't know for sure why the Packers and retailers go thru the extra effort of removing the Canadian labels-- but they have spent over $29 million to buy out congressmen, the USDA, and what used to be a good cattlemans organization, NCBA, in order to keep defrauding the consumer.
 

Latest posts

Top