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New Zealand to resume import of Canadian beef ~ article/link

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waterloo_boy

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New Zealand to resume import of Canadian beef

(CBC) - New Zealand will resume the import of Canadian beef immediately, federal Agricultural Minister Andy Mitchell said Friday.

Mitchell said the country has acknowledged that Canadian beef is safe.

New Zealand was one of 34 counties that closed its border to Canadian beef and cattle after the first case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy was discovered in a Canadian-born cow in May 2003.


New Zealand is the 15th country to lift its ban in the last two years.

The United States, Canada's biggest market, accepts some cuts of beef, but no live cattle.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture had planned to reopen the border to cattle under 30 months March 7, but an American cattle lobby group was successful in getting an injunction.

R-CALF argued that Canada doesn't adequately test for mad cow, saying reopening the border would have economic consequences for U.S. producers.

On March 2, federal Judge Richard Cebull agreed to the injunction, and he has set a July 27 date for trial on R-CALF's concerns with the USDA.

The USDA is appealing Cebull's injunction decision, which will be heard July 13.

http://www.mytelus.com/news/article.do?pageID=cbc/canada_home&articleID=1975223
 

Tam

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PORKER said:
THEIR consumers want BSE tested Beef though,or non at all.
Can you explain how you come to this statement when the Press release doesn't say anything about testing? This was a email we recieved


Dear CBEF Members,

I am very pleased to announce that New Zealand has normalized trade in all edible beef products derived from all ages of Canadian cattle. The means that New Zealand will allow importation of boneless, bone-in and offal products from cattle over and under the age of 30 months. The agreement is effective immediately.
This agreement is important as New Zealand is a major supplier of beef products to key markets in Asia, Middle East/North Africa and Europe. New Zealand has established worldwide precedent that they can import all edible Canadian beef while still maintaining their access to international markets. This precedent should allow Mexico to expand its access for Canadian beef to include at least bone-in beef from UTM cattle, if not all remaining edible beef products as well - knowing that the Japan and South Korea (who will not cut off imports of beef from New Zealand) will no longer be able to justify restrictions from Mexico. The United States has previously indicated that maintaining/regaining access for American beef with Japan have complicated the process to normalize trade in Canadian beef and cattle. New Zealand's leadership should again assist the USA in normalizing trade with Canada by removing the threat of challenges in Japan and other key international markets.

New Zealand has shown itself to be a friend of Canada in our attempts to recover from the trade crisis that is BSE.
I would also like to thank the efforts of International Trade Canada, Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in completing this important trade agreement.

Yours truly,
Ted Haney
And Attached to it was a link to this

NEW ZEALAND LIFTS IMPORT RESTRICTIONS ON CANADIAN BEEF
OTTAWA, July 8, 2005 - Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Andy Mitchell today announced that New Zealand will lift their remaining BSE-related restrictions on Canadian beef, effective immediately. New Zealand Food Safety Authority (NZFSA) has recognised that the consumer safeguards implemented in Canada to manage the human health risks associated with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are equivalent to New Zealand's standards. This means that NZFSA acknowledges the safety of Canadian beef with respect to BSE.

"The normalisation of beef trade with New Zealand, a BSE-free country, is a solid acknowledgement of the effectiveness of our BSE measures in assuring the safety of Canadian beef," said Minister Mitchell. "Canadians can take pride in their livestock industry, and the tremendous lengths they have gone to demonstrate that our beef is among the best in the world."
New Zealand will remove the case-by-case assessment of Canadian bovine products currently in place and arrange for immediate implementation of our equivalence decision and the agreed certification for bovine products exported from Canada.

New Zealand officials have indicated they hold Canada in high regard with respect to its agricultural practices and food safety risk management systems.
This announcement is an important element of the Government of Canada's commitment to the resumption of full market access with key markets. This marks the 15th country that Canada has resumed full or partial trade with since borders were closed in May 2003.

Now I saw effective immediately but I didn't see anything about testing did you? And since the Government will not test for market access YET I doubt that testing was part of this deal if this is effective immediately.
Didn't R-CALF say if the US took Canadian beef The Asian markets wouldn't open their markets to the US. If this is so why didn't they stop New Zealand a BSE FREE country that took part of the US trade, from taking our Beef?
And you know it is fast starting to look like the US won't have to worry about becoming a dumping ground for beef no other country will take like R-CALF has been saying. As we just had a few new markets open and there is talk of others. I think we are up to 60 countries now, a far cry from NO OTHER COUNTRY :x
 
A

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Tam- A question- How much beef does New Zealand import from Canada? I saw on another site where they are not even listed in the top 60 list of importers of Canadian beef... But Canada does import a good deal of New Zealand product- sounds like New Zealand is kissing up to get you to buy more :?
 

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The normalisation of beef trade with New Zealand, a BSE-free country, is a solid acknowledgement of the effectiveness of our BSE measures in assuring the safety of Canadian beef," said Minister Mitchell.

TAM ,the consumers unions are worried that Canadian beef used in the resturant trade end up in Plate waste's that are shipped to the render will find it's way into the feed supply as the New Zealand government doesn't have a traceback system for feed.Read it in Rangeland.com a while back
 

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Mad cow back on the menu?By LIBBY QUAID

Friday, June 17, 2005 Updated at 2:52 PM EDT

Associated Press
Washington — U.S. cattle are eating chicken litter, cattle blood and restaurant leftovers that could help transmit mad-cow disease — a gap in the defences that the Bush administration promised to close nearly 18 months ago.

"Once the cameras were turned off and the media coverage dissipated, then it's been business as usual, no real reform, just keep feeding slaughterhouse waste," said John Stauber, an activist and co-author of Mad Cow USA: Could the Nightmare Happen Here?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Loopholes in the defence
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

He contended that "the entire U.S. policy is designed to protect the livestock industry's access to slaughterhouse waste as cheap feed."

The Food and Drug Administration promised to tighten feed rules shortly after the first case of mad cow disease was confirmed in the United States in a Washington cow in December, 2003.

"Today we are bolstering our BSE firewalls to protect the public," Mark McClellan, then-FDA commissioner, said on Jan. 26, 2004. The FDA said it would ban blood, poultry litter and restaurant-plate waste from cattle feed and require feed mills to use separate equipment to make cattle feed.

Last July, however, the FDA scrapped those restrictions. Mr. McClellan's replacement, Lester Crawford, said international experts were calling for even stronger rules and that the FDA would produce new restrictions in line with the experts' report.

Today, the FDA still has not done what it promised to do. The agency declined interviews, saying in a statement only that there is no timeline for new restrictions.

"It's just a lot of talk," said Rosa DeLauro, a senior congressional Democrat on food and farm issues. "It's a lot of talk, a lot of press releases, and no action."

Unlike other infections, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) — as mad-cow disease is known officially) — does not spread through the air. As far as scientists know, cows contract the disease only by eating brain and other nerve tissues of already-infected cows.

Ground-up cattle remains left over from slaughtering operations were used as protein in cattle feed until 1997, when a mad-cow outbreak in Britain prompted the United States to order the feed industry to quit doing it. Unlike Britain, however, the U.S. feed ban has exceptions.

For example, it is legal to put ground-up cattle remains in chicken feed. Feed that spills from cages mixes with chicken waste on the ground, then is swept up for use in cattle feed.

Scientists believe the BSE protein will survive the feed-making process and may even survive the trip through a chicken's gut.

That amounts to the legal feeding of some cattle protein back to cattle, said Linda Detwiler, a former Agriculture Department veterinarian who led the department's work on mad cow for several years.

"I would stipulate it's probably not a real common thing, and the amounts are pretty small," Ms. Detwiler said.

Still, if cattle protein is in the system, she said in an interview, it is being fed to cattle.

Cattle protein can also be fed to chickens, pigs and household pets, which presents the risk of accidental contamination in a feed mill.

The General Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, said last month that a feed mill, which it did not identify, accidentally mixed banned protein into cattle feed. By the time inspectors discovered the problem and the mill issued a recall, potentially contaminated cattle feed had already been on the market for about a year, GAO said.

Rendering companies contend that new restrictions would be costly and create hazards from leftover waste. They say changes are not justified.

"We process about 50 billion pounds of product annually — in visual terms, that is a convoy of semi trucks, four lanes wide, running from New York to L.A. every year," said Jim Hodges, president of the meatpacking industry's American Meat Institute Foundation.

While new restrictions stalled, the administration also ignored the advice of its own experts to close the loopholes before allowing Canadian cattle back into the United States.

Cattle trade "should not resume unless and until" loopholes in the feed ban are closed, according to an internal Agriculture Department memo, written by its working group of BSE experts in the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, dated June 15, 2003, shortly after Canada's first case of mad-cow disease.

The ranchers' group, R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America, obtained the memo as part of its lawsuit against the department.

Even though the loopholes remain, the Agriculture Department late last year approved reopening the border. Only a federal judge in Montana is keeping the border closed. He sided with R-CALF, which fears another infected cow shipped south might be carrying the disease, just like the lone U.S. case found in Washington state in 2003.

Today, the department maintains that much has been learned since the memo was written. Lisa Ferguson, senior staff veterinarian for the department, said the memo did not mean the government thought the feed ban was inadequate "or anything other than what it was, a group of suggestions from a group of employees at that point in time."

"Is our feed ban completely perfect and absolutely airtight?" she said. "No, I don't think anybody would claim that. Could changes be made? Yes, changes can be made."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Loopholes in cattle feed
Ground-up cattle remains can be fed to chicken, and chicken litter is fed back to cattle. Poultry feed that spills from cages mixes with chicken waste on the ground, then is swept up for use in cattle feed. Scientists believe the BSE protein will survive the feed-making process and may survive being digested in chickens.
Cattle blood can be fed to cattle and often comes in the form of milk replacement for calves. Some scientists believe blood from infected cattle could transmit the disease.
Restaurant leftovers, called "plate waste," are allowed in cattle feed. Cuts of meat that contain part of the spinal cord, or become contaminated by spinal tissue while being prepared, could be infected with BSE.
Factories are not required to use separate production lines and equipment for feed that contains cattle remains and feed that does not, creating the risk that cattle remains could accidentally go into cattle feed.
Besides being fed to poultry, cattle protein is allowed in feed for pigs and household pets, creating the possibility it could mistakenly be fed to cattle.
Unfiltered tallow, or fat, is allowed in cattle feed, yet it has protein impurities that could be a source of mad cow disease.
Associated Press
 

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Oldtimer said:
Tam- A question- How much beef does New Zealand import from Canada? I saw on another site where they are not even listed in the top 60 list of importers of Canadian beef... But Canada does import a good deal of New Zealand product- sounds like New Zealand is kissing up to get you to buy more :?

Read what ever you wan into it t Oldtimer and try to discredit the fact they are taking our beef because of the amount. But it doesn't change the fact that a BSE FREE country is considering our beef just as safe as their own. It also doesn't change the fact that the Asian markets aren't threatening to close their doors on New Zealand because they will except Canadian beef. New Zealand also has to know until we start moving our product we will have no need from anymore of their product. If there was a risk from taking our beef do you really think New Zealand would open up just so they could sell more to us. When they have the Asian markets that we once had. How dumb do you think the New Zealanders are to set a precedent that could lead to more markets that they now supply beef to openning to us if all they just wanted was to sell more beef. :roll:
 

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Cattle feed ban rules still under consideration

June 26, 2005
MARSHA MOULDER
Farm & Ranch News

Government regulations aren't formalized and put into effect overnight, so it isn't surprising that some feed ban rules being considered to help prevent bovine spongiform encephalopathy in U.S. cattle aren't yet in place, according to an extension beef specialist.

Ted McCollum, Texas Cooperative Extension beef specialist in Amarillo, was responding to an Associated Press story in which activist and writer John Stauber said American cattle are eating chicken litter, cattle blood and restaurant leftovers that could help transmit BSE or mad cow disease.

Stauber contends the Bush administration hasn't followed through on its promise to make policy that would prohibit these practices.

Stauber was quoted as saying, "Once the cameras were turned off and the media coverage dissipated, then it's been business as usual, no real reform, just keep feeding slaughterhouse waste."

U.S. Rep Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., a senior House Democrat on food and farm issues, concurred with Stauber in the AP story. She was quoted as saying, "It's just a lot of talk. It's a lot of talk, a lot of press releases, and no action."

In a phone interview last week, McCollum said, "Whatever regulations get started in government, there are steps that have to be taken. There are interim rules, there are final rules. To snap your fingers and say don't do it anymore is not possible.

"The rules announced in July 2004 are in what is called advanced proposal for new rule making. Right now, everything that was announced is still under consideration. The comments that nothing has been done are partially true in that no final rules have been made yet. The whole process takes some time."

The proposed rule to ban plate waste or food on plates at restaurants that is sometimes recycled into animal feeds has nothing to do with BSE, McCollum said. The ban is being considered because this food interferes with the test the Food and Drug Administration and the USDA use to test feeds for animal protein.

The ban on poultry litter as feed for ruminant animals is still under consideration. Poultry litter, which includes the bedding and manure, is a source of crude protein - as high as 20 percent.

"The historical use for poultry litter is for cattle out in the pasture and as a fertilizer product," McCollum said. "In 1997, the government banned the feeding of meat and bone meal products to ruminants," for fear it could pass on BSE in cattle. "It is still legal to feed that to poultry as a protein source. So poultry feed could contain that. When they clean the houses, any feed that might have been spilled would end up in the litter. In this whole rule-making process, it is being evaluated as to what would be the risk in its ability to transmit BSE to cattle."

Also among the rules being considered is adding blood products, like blood meal, to the list of feeds already banned, McCollum said. In 1997, the U.S. banned the use of ground-up cattle remains left over from slaughtering operations in feeds.

Another rule being considered is requiring feed manufacturing companies that manufacture feeds for both ruminants and non-ruminants to have a facility dedicated exclusively for feed for ruminants to prevent cross contamination, McCollum said.

But even while the cattle industry waits for the government to work through these rules, cattle feeders are doing a good job of policing themselves, McCollum said.

"They are very aware of industry issues and public perception. They would not do anything to endanger the food supply," he said. "Even before the beef ban, those protein sources were not widely used in the beef cattle industry because we have the luxury of other protein sources that are more economical to use in feeding programs."

Burt Rutherford, communications director for the Texas Cattle Feeders Association, and Jay Gray, manager of Graham Land & Cattle Co. in Gonzales, chalked the Associated Press story up to Stauber trying to sell his book "Mad Cow USA: Could the Nightmare Happen Here?"

Rutherford said the plate waste issue is irrelevant because it is food that was safe for human consumption, which means it was safe from BSE.

As for blood products, "From a scientific standpoint, (World Organization for Animal Health) OIE standards have not found any of the (BSE) infected material in blood. We're not overly concerned if it hasn't been found in bovine blood."

Still, the TCFA discourages the use of plate waste and blood products for rations fed to feedlot cattle. "To my knowledge, none of that is fed to feedlot cattle," he said.

"Poultry litter is a practice we strongly discourage. Feedlots would never have poultry litter in a ration. We strongly discourage using the practice elsewhere."

Rutherford noted that nearly all of TCFA's members, like Graham Land & Cattle Co., have their own feed mills and therefore don't buy complete rations from someone else. "They buy the different ingredients and then manufacture their feed on site. It gives the feed yard more quality control. You don't want any chance at all of getting ruminant derived bone meal product mixed in with the ingredients."

Rutherford added that feedlots take the BSE issue so seriously they make truck drivers delivering the feed ingredients sign affidavits saying they haven't hauled anything in their trucks that could cause a problem.

Graham Land & Cattle Co.'s Jay Gray said there is a lot of feed recycling going on, and it's not all bad. "Pig people buy all the salvage Fruit Loops, tortillas and bread they can get. They can buy it cheap and put weight gain on their hogs. It's a good use of a product that is no longer a human food. I get merchandisers calling me all the time wanting to sell me potato slurry, corn slurry and stuff that hits the floor. We don't use it, but I don't think any of that is all bad. But there will be those trying to sell books who will claim everything is bad."
 

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PORKER said:
Mad cow back on the menu?By LIBBY QUAID

Friday, June 17, 2005 Updated at 2:52 PM EDT

Associated Press
Washington — U.S. cattle are eating chicken litter, cattle blood and restaurant leftovers that could help transmit mad-cow disease — a gap in the defences that the Bush administration promised to close nearly 18 months ago.

"Once the cameras were turned off and the media coverage dissipated, then it's been business as usual, no real reform, just keep feeding slaughterhouse waste," said John Stauber, an activist and co-author of Mad Cow USA: Could the Nightmare Happen Here?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Loopholes in the defence
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

He contended that "the entire U.S. policy is designed to protect the livestock industry's access to slaughterhouse waste as cheap feed."

The Food and Drug Administration promised to tighten feed rules shortly after the first case of mad cow disease was confirmed in the United States in a Washington cow in December, 2003.

"Today we are bolstering our BSE firewalls to protect the public," Mark McClellan, then-FDA commissioner, said on Jan. 26, 2004. The FDA said it would ban blood, poultry litter and restaurant-plate waste from cattle feed and require feed mills to use separate equipment to make cattle feed.

Last July, however, the FDA scrapped those restrictions. Mr. McClellan's replacement, Lester Crawford, said international experts were calling for even stronger rules and that the FDA would produce new restrictions in line with the experts' report.

Today, the FDA still has not done what it promised to do. The agency declined interviews, saying in a statement only that there is no timeline for new restrictions.

"It's just a lot of talk," said Rosa DeLauro, a senior congressional Democrat on food and farm issues. "It's a lot of talk, a lot of press releases, and no action."

Unlike other infections, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) — as mad-cow disease is known officially) — does not spread through the air. As far as scientists know, cows contract the disease only by eating brain and other nerve tissues of already-infected cows.

Ground-up cattle remains left over from slaughtering operations were used as protein in cattle feed until 1997, when a mad-cow outbreak in Britain prompted the United States to order the feed industry to quit doing it. Unlike Britain, however, the U.S. feed ban has exceptions.

For example, it is legal to put ground-up cattle remains in chicken feed. Feed that spills from cages mixes with chicken waste on the ground, then is swept up for use in cattle feed.

Scientists believe the BSE protein will survive the feed-making process and may even survive the trip through a chicken's gut.

That amounts to the legal feeding of some cattle protein back to cattle, said Linda Detwiler, a former Agriculture Department veterinarian who led the department's work on mad cow for several years.

"I would stipulate it's probably not a real common thing, and the amounts are pretty small," Ms. Detwiler said.

Still, if cattle protein is in the system, she said in an interview, it is being fed to cattle.

Cattle protein can also be fed to chickens, pigs and household pets, which presents the risk of accidental contamination in a feed mill.

The General Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, said last month that a feed mill, which it did not identify, accidentally mixed banned protein into cattle feed. By the time inspectors discovered the problem and the mill issued a recall, potentially contaminated cattle feed had already been on the market for about a year, GAO said.

Rendering companies contend that new restrictions would be costly and create hazards from leftover waste. They say changes are not justified.

"We process about 50 billion pounds of product annually — in visual terms, that is a convoy of semi trucks, four lanes wide, running from New York to L.A. every year," said Jim Hodges, president of the meatpacking industry's American Meat Institute Foundation.

While new restrictions stalled, the administration also ignored the advice of its own experts to close the loopholes before allowing Canadian cattle back into the United States.

Cattle trade "should not resume unless and until" loopholes in the feed ban are closed, according to an internal Agriculture Department memo, written by its working group of BSE experts in the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, dated June 15, 2003, shortly after Canada's first case of mad-cow disease.

The ranchers' group, R-CALF United Stockgrowers of America, obtained the memo as part of its lawsuit against the department.

Even though the loopholes remain, the Agriculture Department late last year approved reopening the border. Only a federal judge in Montana is keeping the border closed. He sided with R-CALF, which fears another infected cow shipped south might be carrying the disease, just like the lone U.S. case found in Washington state in 2003.

Today, the department maintains that much has been learned since the memo was written. Lisa Ferguson, senior staff veterinarian for the department, said the memo did not mean the government thought the feed ban was inadequate "or anything other than what it was, a group of suggestions from a group of employees at that point in time."

"Is our feed ban completely perfect and absolutely airtight?" she said. "No, I don't think anybody would claim that. Could changes be made? Yes, changes can be made."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Loopholes in cattle feed
Ground-up cattle remains can be fed to chicken, and chicken litter is fed back to cattle. Poultry feed that spills from cages mixes with chicken waste on the ground, then is swept up for use in cattle feed. Scientists believe the BSE protein will survive the feed-making process and may survive being digested in chickens.
Cattle blood can be fed to cattle and often comes in the form of milk replacement for calves. Some scientists believe blood from infected cattle could transmit the disease.
Restaurant leftovers, called "plate waste," are allowed in cattle feed. Cuts of meat that contain part of the spinal cord, or become contaminated by spinal tissue while being prepared, could be infected with BSE.
Factories are not required to use separate production lines and equipment for feed that contains cattle remains and feed that does not, creating the risk that cattle remains could accidentally go into cattle feed.
Besides being fed to poultry, cattle protein is allowed in feed for pigs and household pets, creating the possibility it could mistakenly be fed to cattle.
Unfiltered tallow, or fat, is allowed in cattle feed, yet it has protein impurities that could be a source of mad cow disease.
Associated Press

What does pointing out the loopholes of the US system have to do with the New Zealand/ Canadian deal? No where did I see anything about the New Zealand Consumer Unions being concerned only stories about the what the US consumer unions are concerned about.
 

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Hon Jim Sutton Minister of Agriculture
15 Mar 2005
Christchurch
Hon Jim Sutton Member of Parliament for Aoraki

Minister of Agriculture, Minister for Trade Negotiations, Minister for Biosecurity, and Associate Minister for Rural Affairs
Chairman Jeff Grant, chief executive Mark Jeffries, special guest Tim Bennett
There arise on a regular basis various trade access issues which often require considerable response from officials – and often ministers – to ensure that trade is not hampered or made more costly. The importance of this maintenance-type role in ensuring continued access for our meat and other products to vital overseas markets should not be underestimated.
For example: last year the European Union introduced a waste products directive which introduced new requirements on rendering facilities and laid down new processes for dealing with slaughterhouse byproducts. If the New Zealand industry had been forced to comply with these European regulations, it would have cost our producers an estimated $200 million.
However, NZ Food Safety Authority officials were able to convince the EU that our existing system is equivalent, it produces the same outcome, the meat industry about $200 million in compliance costs.

Does New Zealand import livestock or livestock products?
Yes, but under strict import protocols designed to prevent the entry of new or harmful organisms. More commonly, New Zealand imports germ plasm such as semen, ova or embryos where 'washing' techniques substantially reduce the risk of unwanted organisms.

What are the protections against importing a TSE into New Zealand?
Since 1984, there have been five importations of sheep bloodlines from countries other than Australia. Each has been from a country considered to be free from Scrapie. Despite this, such imports have been subject to tough conditions including a quarantine period of three to five years, an embryo transfer barrier and testing of tissue from the donor sheep.

Effective 8 January 2001, New Zealand, along with Australia and other countries (including Japan, USA, Canada and Middle Eastern countries), implemented a 6-month temporary suspension on the import of European beef and beef products from 30 countries .
Beef imports are suspended until a certification system is in place that shows beef exports from the EU-15, 14 other European countries and Oman (which also has had two BSE cases) meet the EU's standards on BSE protection.
This means EU standards will also apply to imports into New Zealand of other countries' beef and beef products.
The New Zealand and Australian Governments are in the process of agreeing a certification system, which will go through a process of public consultation.
 

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Porker could you please use you edit button and go back and highlight the statements in the three previous posts from you that prove the New Zealand consumers will only take tested beef or non at all, as I still fail to see your point, I'm I just missing it or is there another point to your posts? :?
 

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THIS is whats important TAM (meet the EU's standards on BSE protection.) New Zealand imports of beef.
This means EU standards will also apply to imports into New Zealand of other countries' beef and beef products.
As far as I know ,THERE is no beef being exported to the EU from Canada as Canada does not meet EU.beef standards, unless you can prove me wrong.
 

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Tam said:
Oldtimer said:
Tam- A question- How much beef does New Zealand import from Canada? I saw on another site where they are not even listed in the top 60 list of importers of Canadian beef... But Canada does import a good deal of New Zealand product- sounds like New Zealand is kissing up to get you to buy more :?

Read what ever you wan into it t Oldtimer and try to discredit the fact they are taking our beef because of the amount. But it doesn't change the fact that a BSE FREE country is considering our beef just as safe as their own. It also doesn't change the fact that the Asian markets aren't threatening to close their doors on New Zealand because they will except Canadian beef. New Zealand also has to know until we start moving our product we will have no need from anymore of their product. If there was a risk from taking our beef do you really think New Zealand would open up just so they could sell more to us. When they have the Asian markets that we once had. How dumb do you think the New Zealanders are to set a precedent that could lead to more markets that they now supply beef to openning to us if all they just wanted was to sell more beef. :roll:
Another R-Calf arguing point for keeping Canadian product out shot down in flames.
 

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PORKER said:
THIS is whats important TAM (meet the EU's standards on BSE protection.) New Zealand imports of beef.
This means EU standards will also apply to imports into New Zealand of other countries' beef and beef products.
As far as I know ,THERE is no beef being exported to the EU from Canada as Canada does not meet EU.beef standards, unless you can prove me wrong.
Don't you think that just maybe the New Zealand government would know something about this. Don't you think someone in their government would have stepped up and said hey boys we can't make a deal with Canada because of the EU thing before they agreed to the deal with Canada and Canada released the information to the industry. According to the press releases we have seen this is a done deal effective immediately and it doesn't mention meeting EU standards.
 

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All countries must meet the EU's standards on BSE protection for New Zealand imports of beef.
This means EU standards will also apply to imports into New Zealand of other countries' beef and beef products.
You will need certification an a document trail for proof.
 

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