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Shipping heifers to the U.S. has dire consequences

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STAFF

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Shipping heifers to the U.S. has dire consequences without complete source Verification Records

Harry Siemens - At least three live cattle exporters and two veterinarians wish they hadn’t exported heifers from Manitoba to the United States because some of the heifers were pregnant.
According to Dr. Allan Preston, Assistant Deputy Minister of Agriculture said at least three shipments out of Manitoba have included pregnant heifers in addition to the one shipped from Ontario that included one 31-month-old animal and eight pregnant heifers.
“Before we rush to any conclusions on the Manitoba shipments, the mistakes are honest ones,” said Preston. “These heifers that are going for slaughter based on the wording of the rule cannot be pregnant. As part of the process, the heifers are pregnancy-tested by rectal palpation to determine if they’re open or not.”
The veterinarian to the best of his ability makes that call and it’s not as easy as some might think to be 100 percent accurate on a 100 percent of the heifers.
“These animals going down there and turning up pregnant are not ones that are four or five or seven months pregnant, they are heifers that are 30, 40, or maybe 50 days pregnant,” he said. “You have to look pretty closely on the kill floor to find a fetus let alone with your hand up the cow’s behind making the check.”
It also varies from one vet to the next because one who does all kinds of dairy work in his daily practice is used to picking up these pregnancies. However, for a beef cattle veterinarian where the producer tests most of his cows for pregnancies in the fall, when they’re four to six months pregnant, it’s a little different ballgame.
A rule is a rule. When this happens, the reports goes back to the Canadian officials because it doesn’t affect the meat that goes through without any dockage, the price is the same as the next one that wasn’t pregnant. Nevertheless, CFIA has to go back and look at the veterinarian that did the accreditation; slap his knuckles and tell the exporter to stop shipping pregnant heifers.
“We now have three vets in Manitoba who have lost their accreditation for exporting cattle to the U.S., and we have at least three exporters who have a strike against them,” said Preston. “The bottom line is its all for a reason that’s rather inconsequential in the whole scheme of things, but the end result is we have the situation where people will back off very, very quickly from exporting heifers to the U.S.”
He said the industry will back off for two reasons, either the exporter doesn’t want to get his knuckles wrapped, and more directly, the vet will refuse to sign that piece of paper giving the go ahead to export heifers.
The one in Wisconsin is a different deal altogether. There were some people really pushing the envelope, but these from Manitoba are pure and simple errors that would happen with anybody pregnant checking cows. Yet in this situation comes back to haunt the person making the mistake whether honest or not.
The load to the Wisconsin packer came from Ontario and Manitoba doesn’t have to wear the goat’s horn on that one.
“Either way, it’s an unfortunate situation, but it will very quickly have everyone backing right off on sending slaughter heifers to the U.S. It’s just not worth the risk,” he said. “The other side of this equation is the last thing we want to do is get back to this situation of giving R-CALF any ammunition. Each time one of these things happens, it just gives them that.”
It didn’t take long for U.S. border opening opponent R-CALF to show their distaste and say we told you so. R-Calf president Leo McDonnell asked the question after the USDA argued this cow was just one month over the age limit, but how many other Canadian cattle have come into the U.S. in violation of the age constraints, and how much past 30 months of age are they?
He said this incident shows a failure of several key BSE firewalls USDA claims exist for Canadian cattle imports. First, the age test failed, and the U.S. requirements for the removal of SRMs failed, and the USDA has failed to be transparent and reveal what happened to the remainder of this particular cow.
 

Kathy

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Blatant scare tactics!!!!

I suppose we will be told to give all heifers going south a shot of Lutylase or some similar product that will cause an abortion of the fetus. There will be withdrawal periods, more paperwork and more costs.

Stupid, stupid. When will all this insanity end?
 

Bill

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He said this incident shows a failure of several key BSE firewalls USDA claims exist for Canadian cattle imports. First, the age test failed, and the U.S. requirements for the removal of SRMs failed, and the USDA has failed to be transparent and reveal what happened to the remainder of this particular cow.

:roll: Those firewalls don't just exist for Canadian imports. How many American animals have also slipped through? :roll:
 

CattleCo

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SS you are something else............more SS bull ****! A few pregnant heifers are nothing. Give me a break! ANOTHER REASON WHY PRIVATE DATA WAREHOUSES HAVE NO BUSINESS IN THIS ID THING TO HANDLE THE FORTHCOMING MANDATED INDIVIDUAL ID SYSTEM. :roll: :roll:
if it ever happens????????????????? We do not have anywhere's close to all the Producer/Premise registrations.
 

STAFF

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I wonder why the private system works in most free countrys unless you have a beef about M'ID an don't care about a National Bioterrorism event.

We now have three vets in Manitoba who have lost their accreditation for exporting cattle to the U.S., and we have at least three exporters who have a strike against them,” said Preston. “The bottom line is its all for a reason that’s rather inconsequential in the whole scheme of things, but the end result is we have the situation where people will back off very, very quickly from exporting heifers to the U.S.” So Who do blame ?
 

CattleCo

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but the end result is we have the situation where people will back off very, very quickly from exporting heifers to the U.S.” So Who do blame ?

SO What??? Let the Canadians Keep their heifers.....these pregnant heifers were of NO THREAT TO ANYBODY.....GET F...ingReal SS. You are the terrorist on this board! :roll:
 

Tommy

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Don't the rules say no cattle over thirty months old and no bred cattle? Do we just throw the rule book out the door?
 

CattleCo

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Mistakes happen.........................the bottom line is do not let it happen again....the bred heifers were of NO Threat!!
Those who screwed up were held accountabe.
NO ONE DIED OR GOT SICK FROM THESE HEIFERS!!!!!!!!!!! :roll:
 

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The ONE big REASON that Japan sits on the sidelines is that the USDA argued this cow was just one month over the age limit, but how many other Canadian cattle have come into the U.S. in violation of the age constraints or the US killed with knowing a born DATE .
 

Bill

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PORKER said:
The ONE big REASON that Japan sits on the sidelines is that the USDA argued this cow was just one month over the age limit, but how many other Canadian cattle have come into the U.S. in violation of the age constraints or the US killed with knowing a born DATE .
Not as many as the 31 month old US animals killed on those same lines.

Why aren't you worried about them if it is a health risk?
 

CattleCo

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"The ONE big REASON that Japan sits on the sidelines is that the USDA argued this cow was just one month over the age limit, but how many other Canadian cattle have come into the U.S. in violation of the age constraints or the US killed with knowing a born DATE "

Porker,
The reason the Japs are on the sidline is the USDA does not have the balls to put the pressure on them......Put a huge tariif on electronics and see how long they stop accepting US Beef! BSE is not our biggest worry in the Beef Industry.......................give me a break. :roll:
 

PORKER

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Ever stick your arm in a pail full of Rattle Snakes?????????We are trying too kill trade to another country by Not Following Their internal Country meat Rules.
 

Tam

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Why is it every time the question about How many over 30 month US animals slip though the slaughter line? gets asked we never get an answer? Just more about the ONE Canadian cow that did. Can any of you that yell about the Canadian cow guarantee us as an export market that the same inspector that did NOT catch the ONE Canadian cow hasn't missed a few US over 30 month cows on that same under 30 month line? Remember it was the CFIA that found her NOT the US Inspectors. We had vets loose their accreditation for exporting cattle to the U.S., and we have at least three exporters who have a strike against them. But what happen to the USDA vet at the border that didn't catch the 31 month old or the USDA plant inspector that didn't catch the 31 month old has anything happen to them or are they still on the job missing more over aged cattle and exporting the meat to Canada and Mexico. You seem to think Japan is wondering about how many more OTM Canadian cattle have been slaughter in the US, could they also be think just how many over twenty months will they be shipping to us if the USDA inspectors didn't find the 31 month and Canada had to go back and tell them about it, as Canada is honest about the cattle they ship. If it had been up to the US that animal would have never been recalled as nobody would have known that she was over the 30 month cut off.
 

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