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Texas Livestock Market Reports

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Trinity man

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Well I thought this would be coming. From the looks of a letter I got after Aug. 31 Livestock Market Reporting in Texas will be no longer. Its been a great 11 years of reporting for me and have met tons of great friends over these years. The Texas Department of Agriculture has been force to cut 45% of its operation budget. Thats going to really hurt some good program that helps keep our food source clean. We have Texas Cattle Feeders, Southwest Cattle Feeders, and Livestock Marketing Ass. still fighting to try to keep some of us at least reporting some of the barns, but it maybe a losing battle. There is also some talk that the CME and USDA may join up and hire some of us back, but thats still a long shot.
 

MsSage

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Thank you for your reporting here. I know alot apprecated your work.

On the possitive side......you are done learning what you need and are ready to for the next lesson .......God has a plan, we just have to be ready to follow it.
 

Texan

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I hate the thought of losing the market reports. I get five of them from around East Texas emailed every week and look at some other ones occasionally. They're a big help making marketing decisions - both buying and selling.

I can understand the need to cut some costs, though. I guess there's no reason for the city guy in Dallas to be paying so that I can have my market reports. By the same token, I don't want to pay for some of his state services, either.

User fees would be the way to get around that. I'd be in favor of paying a reasonable user fee for the market reports just to keep the service going.

Guess I'll have to contact my state Senator's office. Thanks for the heads-up.
 

Trinity man

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Texan said:
I hate the thought of losing the market reports. I get five of them from around East Texas emailed every week and look at some other ones occasionally. They're a big help making marketing decisions - both buying and selling.

I can understand the need to cut some costs, though. I guess there's no reason for the city guy in Dallas to be paying so that I can have my market reports. By the same token, I don't want to pay for some of his state services, either.

User fees would be the way to get around that. I'd be in favor of paying a reasonable user fee for the market reports just to keep the service going.

Guess I'll have to contact my state Senator's office. Thanks for the heads-up.


Thanks for the kind words. I understand to about cutting programs to and know our reports do little for some of the big city guys to, but with all the things happening todays time it will hurt some not having them. I will find something else to do to make up what I was making which wasn't much with today fuel prices. Most of us didn't make but 150 per sale and worked from 16-18 hr a day half at the barn and half at home doing the reports. I did for the love of the job and helpping as many people as I could. Like I said earlier I have made so many friends all over the East Texas area and will never forget them. Thanks again. :)
 

High Plains

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Trinity Man, your work was appreciated. Even though I didn't need to know anything about the Texas markets myself, I'm sure many folks relied on the information. After all, what can a person do to market livestock without the necessary information? Now the weekly slaughter cattle summary is not even available as of this week. I can understand some budget cutting, but a national report with that much importance needs to arrive on time every week. I'm not a happy camper!

Best to you, Trinity Man, in your other endeavors. You'll likely find another vocation that will fill in the spot and have some other positives that you hadn't planned on.
 

Hay Feeder

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Thats a bad deal for all of us. Cow trader rumors said cows for se colorado were sold with trucking on them for 750 each. Saturday 40 black cow calf pairs sold at Springfeild MO for average of 3,000 each. I saw the $3000 cow and nothing to brag about really just short and average but fat.

We NEED marekt reporters.
 

cowboyup

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3 and 4 year olds in three forks on monday sold with big calves on their side for $1610. I wonder if the market is weakening
 

Texan

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TDA To Discontinue Market News
Service Due to Budget Cuts

By Colleen Schreiber

NEW BRAUNFELS — The Texas Department of Agriculture took some serious cuts, as did all state agencies during the recent legislative session. Among the program funding cuts was TDA’s market news program, operated in partnership with USDA.

The funding will run out in August at the end of the 2010 fiscal year, at which time the number of market reports available will be trimmed from 21 cattle reports down to three. The three that will continue are Amarillo, San Angelo and the Texas direct report.

That was the message that Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association’s Tim Niedecken brought to the marketing committee during TSCRA’s summer board meeting here. He also told listeners that some of the district cattle on feed estimates will no longer be available, but emphasized that does not mean the Texas on-feed number will go away. Additionally, the 800 hotline number will no longer be available.

The lack of reporting also means that the Texas numbers used to figure the CME feeder cattle index will be minimized.

Niedecken explained in a bit more detail the impact on the feeder cattle index. The way it works is that USDA contributes numbers to the CME, which in turn figures a weighted average based on those numbers. That weighted average is used to figure the feeder cattle index on any given day. There is also a seven-day weighted average that is calculated and used.

Currently Texas feeder numbers make up about 13 percent of the weighted average used in the index. The cattle feeder reports that will no longer be available to contribute to this index, Niedecken told listeners, are Tulia, Dalhart, Texas combined, and Texas combined on Saturday. The Texas Direct report, he said, remains intact, which is critical because that one report accounts for 66 percent of the Texas contribution to the feeder index. Niedecken also looked at the numbers contributing to the feeder cattle index for an entire year, and what he discovered was that roughly 10 percent of the numbers used to calculate the index come from the Texas Direct report.

With help from the CME, Niedecken developed a model for comparing what the loss of these Texas reports would mean to the feeder index.

“The key number is that without the state-funded reports, that index on average will be 11 cents per hundredweight higher on any given day,” Niedecken told listeners. “To some, 11 cents is a big deal; to others it’s not.”

He also ran the model to see what would happen if the Dalhart and Tulia reports remained intact.

“It essentially reduced that 11-cent difference down to about four cents.”

The information he gathered was shared not only with TSCRA’s marketing committee members but also with the CME and USDA.

“CME said 11 cents is no big deal. USDA, on the other hand, is very concerned about this,” Niedecken told listeners. “They are probably less concerned about the 11 cents in the index than they are of losing the visibility in those 20-some markets.

“TDA is also very concerned about this,” he continued. “However, from a budget perspective, they had to make some hard choices.”

The trade associations also were asked for feedback. Texas Cattle Feeders Association expressed concern, he said, but their concern stems more from the loss of grain reports. TSCRA marketing committee members were polled as well, and roughly 70 percent of those who responded said they were indifferent and 30 percent said the reports were really important to their business.

Some livestock markets in Texas self-report. A TSCRA director asked if those particular reports tended to come in higher.

“The short answer is no,” Niedecken responded, “but we did get a lot of comments from market owners who said things like ‘My reports are pristine, but that guy down the road rounds up.’ Other market owners insisted they could self-report as well as TDA. We heard that the market reporters often don’t stay till the end, so their report isn’t what it should be, and so a lot of the market operators have said they don’t want them anyway.”

The one hitch is that the CME will not accept information from self-reporting markets on the grounds that in the USDA reports everything is apples to apples and the livestock markets who self-report don’t necessarily state the report the same way as USDA.

TSCRA officer Pete Bonds encouraged everyone to make sure that the feedyards they do business with are turning in the numbers to either the CME or USDA.

“If they’re not turning them in, then the order buyer needs to, and if the order buyer is not turning them in, then you as the owner need to turn them in, and it needs to be an f.o.b. price, not a delivered price.”

Niedecken wrapped up the discussion by telling committee members that to retain the 20-some TDA market reports, those in the livestock industry would have to come up with approximately $265,000 in annual funding. Otherwise, it is essentially a done deal come August.

The meeting adjourned with no further action taken.



http://www.livestockweekly.com/papers/11/06/23/
 

Trinity man

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Texan said:
TDA To Discontinue Market News
Service Due to Budget Cuts

By Colleen Schreiber

NEW BRAUNFELS — The Texas Department of Agriculture took some serious cuts, as did all state agencies during the recent legislative session. Among the program funding cuts was TDA’s market news program, operated in partnership with USDA.

The funding will run out in August at the end of the 2010 fiscal year, at which time the number of market reports available will be trimmed from 21 cattle reports down to three. The three that will continue are Amarillo, San Angelo and the Texas direct report.

That was the message that Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association’s Tim Niedecken brought to the marketing committee during TSCRA’s summer board meeting here. He also told listeners that some of the district cattle on feed estimates will no longer be available, but emphasized that does not mean the Texas on-feed number will go away. Additionally, the 800 hotline number will no longer be available.

The lack of reporting also means that the Texas numbers used to figure the CME feeder cattle index will be minimized.

Niedecken explained in a bit more detail the impact on the feeder cattle index. The way it works is that USDA contributes numbers to the CME, which in turn figures a weighted average based on those numbers. That weighted average is used to figure the feeder cattle index on any given day. There is also a seven-day weighted average that is calculated and used.

Currently Texas feeder numbers make up about 13 percent of the weighted average used in the index. The cattle feeder reports that will no longer be available to contribute to this index, Niedecken told listeners, are Tulia, Dalhart, Texas combined, and Texas combined on Saturday. The Texas Direct report, he said, remains intact, which is critical because that one report accounts for 66 percent of the Texas contribution to the feeder index. Niedecken also looked at the numbers contributing to the feeder cattle index for an entire year, and what he discovered was that roughly 10 percent of the numbers used to calculate the index come from the Texas Direct report.

With help from the CME, Niedecken developed a model for comparing what the loss of these Texas reports would mean to the feeder index.

“The key number is that without the state-funded reports, that index on average will be 11 cents per hundredweight higher on any given day,” Niedecken told listeners. “To some, 11 cents is a big deal; to others it’s not.”

He also ran the model to see what would happen if the Dalhart and Tulia reports remained intact.

“It essentially reduced that 11-cent difference down to about four cents.”

The information he gathered was shared not only with TSCRA’s marketing committee members but also with the CME and USDA.

“CME said 11 cents is no big deal. USDA, on the other hand, is very concerned about this,” Niedecken told listeners. “They are probably less concerned about the 11 cents in the index than they are of losing the visibility in those 20-some markets.

“TDA is also very concerned about this,” he continued. “However, from a budget perspective, they had to make some hard choices.”

The trade associations also were asked for feedback. Texas Cattle Feeders Association expressed concern, he said, but their concern stems more from the loss of grain reports. TSCRA marketing committee members were polled as well, and roughly 70 percent of those who responded said they were indifferent and 30 percent said the reports were really important to their business.

Some livestock markets in Texas self-report. A TSCRA director asked if those particular reports tended to come in higher.

“The short answer is no,” Niedecken responded, “but we did get a lot of comments from market owners who said things like ‘My reports are pristine, but that guy down the road rounds up.’ Other market owners insisted they could self-report as well as TDA. We heard that the market reporters often don’t stay till the end, so their report isn’t what it should be, and so a lot of the market operators have said they don’t want them anyway.”

The one hitch is that the CME will not accept information from self-reporting markets on the grounds that in the USDA reports everything is apples to apples and the livestock markets who self-report don’t necessarily state the report the same way as USDA.

TSCRA officer Pete Bonds encouraged everyone to make sure that the feedyards they do business with are turning in the numbers to either the CME or USDA.

“If they’re not turning them in, then the order buyer needs to, and if the order buyer is not turning them in, then you as the owner need to turn them in, and it needs to be an f.o.b. price, not a delivered price.”

Niedecken wrapped up the discussion by telling committee members that to retain the 20-some TDA market reports, those in the livestock industry would have to come up with approximately $265,000 in annual funding. Otherwise, it is essentially a done deal come August.

The meeting adjourned with no further action taken.



http://www.livestockweekly.com/papers/11/06/23/

I don't know where they come up with $265,000 for the reports. All of us only made 150 per day for 48 weeks (around $138,000). Thats all the state paid, the rest was paid by the USDA or the CME. We drive our own trucks, and paid our own fuel to get to the sales. I talked with our local representative and she said that this was done by Mr. Staples and not by budget cuts. The budget was so small that it didn't have to go to the state legislation. Mr. Staples cut it to save his wine market program. :roll: She said she will get proof of this and I will makes sure everyone in East Texas hears about this. Even in Mr. Staples home town of Palestine, Texas. I am not upset about loosing my job, but about loosing the information for the cattlemen to use. What kills me - wine for cattle. :roll:

One thing the guy said about us not staying until the end of the sale. Well we have a dead line of 9am the follow morning to get the reports in. When they sale 3-4 thousand hd one at a time it maybe 9am when they get done. Plus most of us has other jobs to be at the next day.
 

allen57

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Trinity man said:
Texan said:
TDA To Discontinue Market News
Service Due to Budget Cuts

By Colleen Schreiber

NEW BRAUNFELS — The Texas Department of Agriculture took some serious cuts, as did all state agencies during the recent legislative session. Among the program funding cuts was TDA’s market news program, operated in partnership with USDA.

The funding will run out in August at the end of the 2010 fiscal year, at which time the number of market reports available will be trimmed from 21 cattle reports down to three. The three that will continue are Amarillo, San Angelo and the Texas direct report.

That was the message that Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association’s Tim Niedecken brought to the marketing committee during TSCRA’s summer board meeting here. He also told listeners that some of the district cattle on feed estimates will no longer be available, but emphasized that does not mean the Texas on-feed number will go away. Additionally, the 800 hotline number will no longer be available.

The lack of reporting also means that the Texas numbers used to figure the CME feeder cattle index will be minimized.

Niedecken explained in a bit more detail the impact on the feeder cattle index. The way it works is that USDA contributes numbers to the CME, which in turn figures a weighted average based on those numbers. That weighted average is used to figure the feeder cattle index on any given day. There is also a seven-day weighted average that is calculated and used.

Currently Texas feeder numbers make up about 13 percent of the weighted average used in the index. The cattle feeder reports that will no longer be available to contribute to this index, Niedecken told listeners, are Tulia, Dalhart, Texas combined, and Texas combined on Saturday. The Texas Direct report, he said, remains intact, which is critical because that one report accounts for 66 percent of the Texas contribution to the feeder index. Niedecken also looked at the numbers contributing to the feeder cattle index for an entire year, and what he discovered was that roughly 10 percent of the numbers used to calculate the index come from the Texas Direct report.

With help from the CME, Niedecken developed a model for comparing what the loss of these Texas reports would mean to the feeder index.

“The key number is that without the state-funded reports, that index on average will be 11 cents per hundredweight higher on any given day,” Niedecken told listeners. “To some, 11 cents is a big deal; to others it’s not.”

He also ran the model to see what would happen if the Dalhart and Tulia reports remained intact.

“It essentially reduced that 11-cent difference down to about four cents.”

The information he gathered was shared not only with TSCRA’s marketing committee members but also with the CME and USDA.

“CME said 11 cents is no big deal. USDA, on the other hand, is very concerned about this,” Niedecken told listeners. “They are probably less concerned about the 11 cents in the index than they are of losing the visibility in those 20-some markets.

“TDA is also very concerned about this,” he continued. “However, from a budget perspective, they had to make some hard choices.”

The trade associations also were asked for feedback. Texas Cattle Feeders Association expressed concern, he said, but their concern stems more from the loss of grain reports. TSCRA marketing committee members were polled as well, and roughly 70 percent of those who responded said they were indifferent and 30 percent said the reports were really important to their business.

Some livestock markets in Texas self-report. A TSCRA director asked if those particular reports tended to come in higher.

“The short answer is no,” Niedecken responded, “but we did get a lot of comments from market owners who said things like ‘My reports are pristine, but that guy down the road rounds up.’ Other market owners insisted they could self-report as well as TDA. We heard that the market reporters often don’t stay till the end, so their report isn’t what it should be, and so a lot of the market operators have said they don’t want them anyway.”

The one hitch is that the CME will not accept information from self-reporting markets on the grounds that in the USDA reports everything is apples to apples and the livestock markets who self-report don’t necessarily state the report the same way as USDA.

TSCRA officer Pete Bonds encouraged everyone to make sure that the feedyards they do business with are turning in the numbers to either the CME or USDA.

“If they’re not turning them in, then the order buyer needs to, and if the order buyer is not turning them in, then you as the owner need to turn them in, and it needs to be an f.o.b. price, not a delivered price.”

Niedecken wrapped up the discussion by telling committee members that to retain the 20-some TDA market reports, those in the livestock industry would have to come up with approximately $265,000 in annual funding. Otherwise, it is essentially a done deal come August.

The meeting adjourned with no further action taken.



http://www.livestockweekly.com/papers/11/06/23/

I don't know where they come up with $265,000 for the reports. All of us only made 150 per day for 48 weeks (around $138,000). Thats all the state paid, the rest was paid by the USDA or the CME. We drive our own trucks, and paid our own fuel to get to the sales. I talked with our local representative and she said that this was done by Mr. Staples and not by budget cuts. The budget was so small that it didn't have to go to the state legislation. Mr. Staples cut it to save his wine market program. :roll: She said she will get proof of this and I will makes sure everyone in East Texas hears about this. Even in Mr. Staples home town of Palestine, Texas. I am not upset about loosing my job, but about loosing the information for the cattlemen to use. What kills me - wine for cattle. :roll:

One thing the guy said about us not staying until the end of the sale. Well we have a dead line of 9am the follow morning to get the reports in. When they sale 3-4 thousand hd one at a time it maybe 9am when they get done. Plus most of us has other jobs to be at the next day.

Hey...they had to hire someone to write the checks..... :)
 

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