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THE TOP TEN REASONS WHY

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HAY MAKER

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THE TOP TEN REASONS WHY U.S. CONSUMERS DESERVE SWIFT IMPLEMENTATION OF COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING

10. Since 1930 Congress has agreed that labeling imports is important. In 1930 Congress passed a law that required most imports to be labeled at retail. If Congress thinks it's so important to label the clothes you wear, isn't it as important to label what you put in your mouth?

9. Voluntary labeling of imports doesn't work. Some have suggested that a voluntary labeling program should be adopted. We've had a voluntary program of labeling for over 70 years and its obvious, it doesn't work. More importantly, consumers overwhelmingly support mandatory country of origin labeling.

8. Country of origin labeling costs virtually nothing. According to the Florida Department of Agriculture, a state where country of origin labeling for produce has been law for more than 20 years, it costs supermarkets 1 or 2 man-hours per store a week - that's far less than one cent per household per week. Aren't the benefits to consumers worth that much? Current federal rules for producers and shippers cover most of any additional effort.

7. Most of our nation's major trading partners, including Canada and Mexico, already require country of origin labeling. According to the USDA's 1998 Foreign Country of Origin Labeling Survey, the United States is among only six of the 37 reporting countries that do not require country of origin labeling on processed meat. Since the time of the 1998 survey, additional countries, such as Japan, have begun requiring country of origin labeling of meat. In addition, some 35 out of the 46 surveyed countries require country of origin labeling for fresh fruits and vegetables. As recently as January 2001, the EU Commission issued tough retail-level country of origin labeling rules for beef.

6. Country of origin labeling helps American producers compete fairly. U.S. producers invest time and resources to meet strict government regulations that help ensure only safe and wholesome products for consumers. They know that by offering consumers a consistently high quality product, labeling can be a valuable tool to help them compete in a marketplace where food products - domestic or imported - gain market share based on performance and value.

5. Who is Against Mandatory Country of Origin Labeling? The major opponents of mandatory labeling are retail grocery chains and large food processors. Mandatory labeling would require only the identification of the country of origin of the meat or produce on the product itself or on the shelf or counters. So, meat from Mexico or garlic from China would have to be identified.


4. Mandatory Country of Origin Labeling is Widely Supported. An overwhelming majority of U.S. producer groups of America supported mandatory labeling legislation. More than 55 Cattle groups from New Jersey to California, from Alabama to Idaho support labeling. The American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Farmers Union support mandatory labeling. Nearly 90 farm, ranch, and consumer groups have written to Congress in support of labeling and the Consumer Federation of America, the National Consumer's League, and Public citizen support mandating country of origin labeling.

3. Overwhelmingly, consumers want to know where their food comes from. Recent polls found nearly four of every five consumers support mandatory country of origin labeling of fresh produce, and 86 percent support country of origin labeling for meats.

2. Country of origin labeling helps food consumers make an informed choice. Labeling works in concert with government inspections, combining regulations and market competition. Only through mandatory labeling can consumers be certain of buying quality food products from the country of their choice.

1. Congress approved and the president signed legislation creating mandatory Country of Origin Labeling. The Senate and House versions of the farm bill adopted language in support of mandatory country of origin labeling. House members voted nearly three-to-one (296 to 121) in favor of mandatory country of origin labeling for produce. The Senate farm bill requires country of origin labeling for fresh produce, peanuts and meat products including beef, pork, lamb and farm-raised fish.

Country of origin labeling of food benefits American consumers and farmers. Retailers and food processors say the costs are too high, but consumers our nation's major trading partners know better.
 

adventureman

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We could all go on and on about why COOL is good or bad, or how it is or isn't going to cost millions of dollars. For all I care, the US can do what it wants. I just think that it is a little bit peculiar that restruant trade won't be under the law, which is a large portion of beef consumption. Also, won't seafood and peanuts, and a few other products also fall under COOL, but not POULTRY! :???: What the heck is going on with that? If COOL is so good, and consumers need to know where their beef came from, why not their poultry?
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rkaiser

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Did not realise that Cool would not affect restaurant trade adventureman.

I wish that some retailers, or restaurant owners would speak out on a sight like this, and tell us what there customers prefer.

Us ranch folk can argue all we want about preference to high marbling barley fed vs. corn fed, or even the leaner, hot climate fed southern states cattle.

I know that we have had it quite easy selling a high marbled, long barley fed, aged product into high end restaurants in Calgary. Bring on the Cargill sterling silver, I say, and that is also a barley fed, high marbling product.

Bring on cool, Canada will still supply a top quality product for the American restaurants I guess?????

Like I said, I don't really know. Never ate grass fed, never ate enough corn fed to judge. Are there any buyers out there reading this stuff who could go beyond the patriotism of proud American and Canadian producers, and give an opinion?
 

HAY MAKER

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adventureman said:
We could all go on and on about why COOL is good or bad, or how it is or isn't going to cost millions of dollars. For all I care, the US can do what it wants. I just think that it is a little bit peculiar that restruant trade won't be under the law, which is a large portion of beef consumption. Also, won't seafood and peanuts, and a few other products also fall under COOL, but not POULTRY! :???: What the heck is going on with that? If COOL is so good, and consumers need to know where their beef came from, why not their poultry?

I pesonally ,along with others would like to see everthing from shoes to hats with a country of orgin label,but you will fight for every inch of that turf you take,this country is run by speacial interests groups,You dont always get what you want. Some times you have to compromise momentarily :wink: .................good luck PS we will be looking at the check off to advertise home grown beef,then there will be a lot of eyes opened.And a helluva fight ..............the joys of ranching :D
 

Mike

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Us ranch folk can argue all we want about preference to high marbling barley fed vs. corn fed, or even the leaner, hot climate fed southern states cattle.

Housewives like the "Grass fed" stuff in the groceries because it looks (and is) leaner and they feel like they are getting more for their money and is supposedly more healthy.
But in a restaurant, they prefer the marbled beef because they only see it after it's cooked.
2 different markets. JMHO

I would like to participate in a test comparison between "Corn Fed" and "Barley Fed". Might be that a carbohydrate is just a carbohydrate.

Wonder if feeding in different climates (hot vs. cold) has anything to do with flavor, marbling? Rate of gain may weigh in. Got me wondering.
 

Faster horses

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Personally, I don't think a housewife knows the difference between marbling or not. What she does know is if the steak she bought is TENDER. That's most important. Tenderness and taste. If she gets a tender, good tasting steak, roast, whatever, she will go back and buy it again.

I've asked several women about marbling and they had no idea what I was talking about.
 

Mike

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Faster horses said:
Personally, I don't think a housewife knows the difference between marbling or not. What she does know is if the steak she bought is TENDER. That's most important. Tenderness and taste. If she gets a tender, good tasting steak, roast, whatever, she will go back and buy it again.

I've asked several women about marbling and they had no idea what I was talking about.

I am simply referring to the fat content on a piece of meat in the showcase. There are no houswives that I know that would buy a "Prime" steak in the grocery.

The only time I have ever seen a Kobe ribeye, it was almost white with fat.
 

STAFF

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National Labels
What sort of affect do you think requiring meats to have a label with their country of origin will have on the US cattle industry?
(22 Dec, 2004 to 31 Dec, 2004)
Producers, packers, and consumers will all benefit. 67%
It will be good for consumers. 9%
There will be almost no difference. 12%
It could mean trouble in the future. 13%
This POLL is from www.mycattle.com
 

agman

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Mike said:
Faster horses said:
Personally, I don't think a housewife knows the difference between marbling or not. What she does know is if the steak she bought is TENDER. That's most important. Tenderness and taste. If she gets a tender, good tasting steak, roast, whatever, she will go back and buy it again.

I've asked several women about marbling and they had no idea what I was talking about.

I am simply referring to the fat content on a piece of meat in the showcase. There are no houswives that I know that would buy a "Prime" steak in the grocery.

The only time I have ever seen a Kobe ribeye, it was almost white with fat.

They will buy it if the exterior fat is trimmed. That is why retail is now 1/4 inch or less trim and many are gone to denuded product only.
 
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Some restaurants have told me that they have tried to get US sourced and labeled beef- but it is tough to do...Their suppliers can't guarantee it because they are not told where it came from and it is unlabeled...
They have told me that they would use it in their advertising if they could get a guaranteed source of supply of US Beef...

I listened to a Coors Beer commercial on the radio the other day- they were advertising that it was made with Montana and Wyoming sourced Barley...

But I suppose they are only doing that to make us feel good--They wouldn't think this could sell more of their beer :wink: :? Coors is probably just marketing beer for the fun of it- not to make a profit :wink:
 

adventureman

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Oldtimer said:
Some restaurants have told me that they have tried to get US sourced and labeled beef- but it is tough to do...Their suppliers can't guarantee it because they are not told where it came from and it is unlabeled...
They have told me that they would use it in their advertising if they could get a guaranteed source of supply of US Beef...

If there is such market for verified US sourced beef, why don't you and Haymaker get together, and capitalize on the market?

Oldtimer said:
I listened to a Coors Beer commercial on the radio the other day- they were advertising that it was made with Montana and Wyoming sourced Barley...

But I suppose they are only doing that to make us feel good--They wouldn't think this could sell more of their beer :wink: :? Coors is probably just marketing beer for the fun of it- not to make a profit :wink:

Montana and Wyoming sourced barley, grown in Canada and sold to a US grain company, which is then sold to the brewers? :wink: Just kiding, the Canadian brewer Molsons did the same thing and said that Saskatchewan barley improved sexual performance or something like that.
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adventureman

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Mike said:
Us ranch folk can argue all we want about preference to high marbling barley fed vs. corn fed, or even the leaner, hot climate fed southern states cattle.

Housewives like the "Grass fed" stuff in the groceries because it looks (and is) leaner and they feel like they are getting more for their money and is supposedly more healthy.
But in a restaurant, they prefer the marbled beef because they only see it after it's cooked.
2 different markets. JMHO

I would like to participate in a test comparison between "Corn Fed" and "Barley Fed". Might be that a carbohydrate is just a carbohydrate.

Wonder if feeding in different climates (hot vs. cold) has anything to do with flavor, marbling? Rate of gain may weigh in. Got me wondering.

Blind taste tests have shown no difference between corn and barley fed beef. Maybe it is true, but US beef tastes different then Canadian beef, I don't care what anyone says. Could be feed, genetics, or different cooking methods/ingredients.

Also, someone in the know, why is poultry exempt?? If COOL is such a necessity why is the most popular meat product not included??
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redriver

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Before you can have COOL, you need a national ID program, and it seems that there is still a lot of resistance to that. Why, I don't know.
As far as Canadian ranchers' view on COOL, I think most of us would say "go for it". We have no problem with your industry trying to highlite your own product. But don't try to use it as a weapon to keep our product out of your market illegally. That's all we ask, is fair trade.
 

rancher

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Also, someone in the know, why is poultry exempt?? If COOL is such a necessity why is the most popular meat product not included??

Maybe I would say because it all is USA chicken!
 
A

Anonymous

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OT: "Some restaurants have told me that they have tried to get US sourced and labeled beef- but it is tough to do...Their suppliers can't guarantee it because they are not told where it came from and it is unlabeled..."

Did you tell him that the "M"COOL proponents didn't want to be burdened with traceback?

Nothing speaks louder to the ignorance of those who claim to be in the cattle industry and not the beef industry than "M"ID prohibited from "M"COOL.

"M"COOL, as written, is a joke!

Labeling 5% of our total beef consumption as imported without a traceback system to enforce it. Creating a novelty item out of foreign beef at the expense of segregating and labeling all beef.

What more proof do you need than the fact that Mike Callicrate's "born, raised, and processed in the U.S." branded beef products are suffering from consumer apathy. Taken directly from R-CULT's publication.

What more proof do you need that country of origin is not a priority with most consumers than all the household goods in your house that are foreign products?

Heck, I know some "BUY US BEEF" R-CALFers that are rolling bales out to their cows with Belarus tractors.

"M"COOL is the classic "symbolism over substance"!

Understandably supported by liberals who want more government intervention.


~SH~
 

Murgen

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I listened to a Coors Beer commercial on the radio the other day- they were advertising that it was made with Montana and Wyoming sourced Barley

Maybe someone can confirm a rumour I heard last week that Coors is actually sponsoring RCALF?

Could it be that the RCALF is in Montana?
 

Tam

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rancher said:
Also, someone in the know, why is poultry exempt?? If COOL is such a necessity why is the most popular meat product not included??

Maybe I would say because it all is USA chicken!

Sorry Rancher but according to the USDA import records, the US imported $134,839,000.00 worth of Poultry fresh and frozen in 2004 , of which $123,285,000.00 came from Canada an the rest from 15 other countries. They also imported $37,931,000.00 worth of live poultry, of which $35,901,000 came for Canada. So not all poultry eaten in the US is US.
 

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