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Training a Dog to Come, Even When They Don't Want to

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Jeannie

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Ok guys, need some help here. I have 3 American Eskimo/Border Collie cross dogs. They are full brother/sisters, turned 4 years old last November, and spent their first 1 1/2 years in the city (Atlanta, GA). They are very smart, highly energetic, too darned cute (my personal downfall - I'm laughing at them when I should be disciplining them), and they listen pretty good except when there is another dog, rabbit, strange cat, etc around. How do I go about training them to come when I give the command regardless of what is around and how much they want to chase it? Any help would be appreciated. Also, Eskies are known for their territoriality, how can I get them to not want to fight every other dog that comes on the place? (We have a horse boarding business and the local farrier works out of our barn a couple days a week, plus he lives next door and has 4 dogs - two of whom wander over at will. There are ALWAYS at least 5 or six dogs that are wandering in and out, and that doesn't count the dogs that come with people getting their horses shoed or trimmed.) HELP!!! I hate that they can't run, but I can't take a chance on them getting in a fight and getting hurt. Yes, I'm overprotective, but I also can't afford vet bills. Thanks!
 

Jinglebob

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I'm sure there is a way to do it, but are you sure you want to go thru' with it, no matter how brutul it seems or time consuming? I think you better ask yourself these questions before you decide to stasrt a training program.

A year and a half old dog has some pretty established patterns and routines. Not that they can't be trained, but you are going to have to establish yourself as the Alpha of the pack and that might take some pretty severe treatment.

Ever watch dogs fight? Thats what they are doing. Establishing the pecking order. The boss dog can whip, or at least the rest think he/she can whip, all of the rest of the pack.

Sounds like you have too many other dogs around to be very helpful/copecetic to a good training enviroment.
 

Denny

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Jeannie said:
Ok guys, need some help here. I have 3 American Eskimo/Border Collie cross dogs. They are full brother/sisters, turned 4 years old last November, and spent their first 1 1/2 years in the city (Atlanta, GA). They are very smart, highly energetic, too darned cute (my personal downfall - I'm laughing at them when I should be disciplining them), and they listen pretty good except when there is another dog, rabbit, strange cat, etc around. How do I go about training them to come when I give the command regardless of what is around and how much they want to chase it? Any help would be appreciated. Also, Eskies are known for their territoriality, how can I get them to not want to fight every other dog that comes on the place? (We have a horse boarding business and the local farrier works out of our barn a couple days a week, plus he lives next door and has 4 dogs - two of whom wander over at will. There are ALWAYS at least 5 or six dogs that are wandering in and out, and that doesn't count the dogs that come with people getting their horses shoed or trimmed.) HELP!!! I hate that they can't run, but I can't take a chance on them getting in a fight and getting hurt. Yes, I'm overprotective, but I also can't afford vet bills. Thanks!


1 dog good dog

2 dog 1/2 dog

3 dog dead dogs

your problem is "TO MANY DOGS"
 

Kato

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As they say, "Three's a pack".

I would think it can be done, but it will take time.

It will also take time doing one on one work with only one dog at a time, and no others around. If there are obedience classes anywhere around, it would be worth enrolling one dog. Preferable the dog who is the boss of the three. The "recall" is the foundation of obedience training, and these dogs need to learn it.
 

Jeannie

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Thanks guys. You have pretty much confirmed my thoughts. I started obedience training these guys when they were puppies, and alone, all but 1 are very responsive to my commands. But, when they are together the pack mentality takes over. Jinglebob, I especially appreciate that you answered, and no, I'm not prepared to be 'pretty severe' with them. I bought an electronic training collar, but could not bring myself to push the button. I will see if I can find an obedience class. I know who is the dominant dog, so I will work with him and, between the classes and me working with him, maybe I can get a handle on this. I do appreciate the replies! :D
 

nr

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Has anyone had luck training their cat to come? :???: We have an 8-wk old who will be an outdoor cat but I'd like to be able to call it.
 

Jinglebob

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Only luck I've had with training a cat to come is to say "here Kitty kitty kitty kitty", etc until they come and have food waiting for them when they get there EVERYTIME! Cats say to you, "you come to me, I got too many things to do to bother coming to you" untill they want food or petted! :lol:

As far as dogs, why is everyone so dead set against kenneling a dog? I wouldn't turn my colts loose in the yard and expect them to come to me and go work cattle on their own, without some training.

If a dog has a good, well sized, comfortable kennel and is exercised everyday so as not to get bored, they are happy in their kennel. When they get done training, they go back to the kennel to kickback, relax and think things over. The only time my dogs don't want to kennel, is when they haven't been let out to run enough.

Kennels help in the training as when the dog screws up, you just kennel them and don't scream and holler. After a while you take them back out and try again. As long as they are doing good they get to stay out and "play" in their training and when they mess up they have to go and set and think about it. Works great.

Dogs have been bred to do specific tasks and most of the breed of choice have the instincts to do that task, with a little help and training. Much as a child being sent to school or working with an older more experienced person. Don't give them more than they can handle or you will blow their mind. A young dog gets much more out of 3 sessions of 5 minute training by a person than 1 session of 15 minutes. As they progress they get more complicated tasks and longer sessions.

Most people don't have the disipline to do the job right. In dogs, horses or kids! :lol:
 

Jeannie

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nr said:
Has anyone had luck training their cat to come? :???: We have an 8-wk old who will be an outdoor cat but I'd like to be able to call it.

Actually, I have never had a cat that wouldn't at least answer me when I called it. I have no idea how I 'trained' them. All I can think is that maybe it had something to do with the fact that when I first got them, I would never let them outside unless I was with them and when they wandered too far, I would call them back, pick them up and scratch their ears. :?


Jinglebob, I can't answer that question. My dogs loved their kennel/crate and would voluntarily go there to take a nap. I know what you are saying, though, a lot of people think it's cruel. It's a wonderful aid for many kinds of training and actually helps to keep the dog from many less desirable forms of correction.
 

Kato

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About the dogs.... I have been giving it some thought, and just remembered a very important thing we learned at obedience class that you really should try. This is easy, simple, and it really does work. I'm not sure if other classes teach this, but if they don't, they should.

The very first thing we learned in class was something called the 'long down'. It's not like the usual down command though. What it involves is this. In the beginning, you sit on the floor (or ground if it's an outside dog). You take the dog by the collar, put your hand on it's back, and gently make it lie down beside you. You don't say anything, you don't praise, you just make it lie down. Then you stay there for as long as you can stand being bored! Actually, they recommend 20 minutes a day. When you are done, you quietly get up, call the dog, and then praise it. After you have done this for a week or so, you can switch to sitting on a chair and having the dog lie beside you.

It sounds so simple, but the attitude change in the dog is nothing short of amazing. What you are telling the dog, in it's own language is that you are the dominant pack member, and that his place is as number two. It's so subtle, but when we were in obedience class, you could pick out the dogs who had faithfully done their long downs at home. They look at their owners in a totally different way, and actually pay attention to them! This is much easier if you have a dog that comes in the house, because you can watch TV while you are doing it, but I used to read a book with my outdoor dog and it worked just fine.

K9 Psychology 101. :lol:
 

Denny

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I had a dog that would run the country and not listen I taught him the "LONG DOWN" but it was a "LONG SHOT"


Redneck dog training 101
 

Jinglebob

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Great idea Kato! Bet it works real good.

We've got a young feller who is quiter the horse trainer, in our country. He talks of just spending time with your horse. On his back or any other, as long as it's constructive. I think the same principle applies.

He also says to rerward your horse whenever he comes to you. And no not with apples, carrots or oats, but with some scratchin' or pettin. Makes them like you better and makes a partner instead of a slave. As he put it, "If you had a friend come up and want to visit with you and you just turned and walked away, how do you suppose he'd react after several attempts on his part?"
 

Murgen

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Speaking of horses, has ayone here seen the guy that will take an unbroken horse and have him halter broke within an hour? He uses it as a Christian ministry of sorts, but he comes to Ontario a few times of year. Always wanted to go watch one of his "shows" but haven't had the chance yet. I forget what he calls himself.
 

Jeannie

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Thanks Kato! I will give that a try. Sounds like it may be just what I'm looking for. I used to just indiscriminately give my dogs treats. Then I stumbled across an article that recommended making them work for it. Now, they have to do something - sit, lay down, give me a high five, speak, etc. It has made a difference in their attitude. The long down may be just the ticket to help them turn the corner! :D
 

Faster horses

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On the fellow with the Christian Ministry horsemanship, there may be more than one, but a fellow proclaiming the same thing came through this area a few years back. We have some friends that obligingley took a horse to him to be ridden for the first time in front of a crowd. As a result, that horse is basically ruined. Those people that make those claims are probably correct MOST OF THE TIME, but not always. They don't know what every horse is going to do and this one gave him some trouble and in trying to get it all solved in an hour, managed to really mess up the horse in the process. The folks have finally given up on her and I think she will be canned. Too bad, she was a nice young, well-bred little horse. Just too much, too quick~

Even in halter breaking horses, each one reacts differently. I think these guys that proclaim what THEY can do, should be more into what the HORSE can do. After all, it is the nice horses that can be halter broke in an hour. What about the other, perhaps more sensitive horses? My take on these guys are they have big egos and do not have the horses best interests in mind. And horses can't tell time~so it could take all day to do it right...

Boy, I really threw on some cold water, didn't I? Didn't set out to do that, but EGO bothers me. There's a lot of ego when someone brags about doing something in an hour. Especially when I saw the result and it wasn't good.
 

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