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Trolling for yearlings

Northern Rancher

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Ray and I were getting a fresh paddock ready for the yealings hfrs-about 200 of the 225 came through on their own but 25 held up about a quarter mile from the gate-I buzzed over on the side by side but all I accomplished was burning up gas and packing down grass. Ray went for some supplies and while I was pounding a ground rod in the came up to the gate to check me out. Even cattle are amazed by the sight of me working I guess. I figured if I went around them they turn and face me-so I tied a plastic fence post to the end of my lariet and let out about twenty feet I did a loop by the gate and they saw it and followed it into their new grass. Now Ty and I can move a different bunch after supper.
 

Northern Rancher

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When I used to video cattle for Superior I did that-you could get a nice video of the cattle following something that was being dragged. This is a nice bunch of cattle to handle.
 

lefty

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yearling cattle are a breed of their own thats for sure , One time a large weather balloon came down in my calving pasture & floated along the ground . It took half an hour but 200 black angus cows managed to kill it .

That would have made a good vidio
 

gcreekrch

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lefty said:
yearling cattle are a breed of their own thats for sure , One time a large weather balloon came down in my calving pasture & floated along the ground . It took half an hour but 200 black angus cows managed to kill it .

That would have made a good vidio


:lol: The visual on that is good.
 

Soapweed

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One time a few years ago, I needed to move a couple hundred yearling heifers into the next pasture. This was along a main gravel road, so I arrived on location driving a pickup pulling a trailer with my horse on board. As luck would have it, the whole bunch was standing together right beside the gate that they needed to go through to get into the new pasture. I didn't need to unload the horse, so opened the gate. The heifers started filing through, and it was an excellant opportunity to get a good count. Everything was working like a dream. Coming down the road was a pickup. Had it just gone on by, everything would have been fine. But alas, it was a feed salesman wanting to visit with me. Had he parked back a ways to let me continue counting, all would have been well. Instead he drove up close and got out to "help" me "shoo" them through the gate. :roll: Things went to heck in a hand basket, and the remaining heifers boogered and took off. I did have to get my horse out after all. Needless to say, I didn't buy any feed from that feller. :? :roll:
 

Faster horses

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Mr. Fh has had to move our yearlings by himself many times. He goes horseback and gets them to follow him. (They are so nosey!) I've seen
them follow him across a creek, even. He likes doing it that way over
getting extra riders and 'hurrahing' them. Yearlings are strange creatures,
alright.

Good story, Soapweed. Amazing what happens when you work with
the cattle as opposed to doing it the 'human way.' Sorry about the
feed salesman... :p
 

littlejoe

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Last yr me and the boss lady went out to load about 50 yrlg heifers. There's a 'cow underpass' that i'd made into a trap, with a little wing. Works really good when cows are used to going under, these never had.

She took the 4 wheeler and went one way, I took my horse and went another. After some riding, I didn't have any, so went to meet her. Popped over a ridge, she had them all, they were formed into a 'line abreast', going exactly the right way and I was in exactly the wrong spot.

I turned around and headed for the trap--as long as I stayed ahead, they'd kinda 'point' on me, if i slowed down, they'd pull out to pass. jog--trot--really trot--lope--accelerate down hill into a subby spot, boggy enuf that feet are about outa stirrups then up one of them little hills that cattle in this mood speed up on---into the trap, do a calf roper slide almost into the far fence, whole clatter jammed in with me like a buncha trick or treaters wanting to get first go. Got about 60 seconds till exodus starts and I'm on far side. Meanwhile, the brains of the outfit has found a place to cross, comes Parnelli'ng over the hill in high gear, does a nifty little slide into the hole---and it's Carol Ann by a nose!

Shoot, ain't nuthin to this cowboyin...
 

Soapweed

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Faster horses said:
Mr. Fh has had to move our yearlings by himself many times. He goes horseback and gets them to follow him. (They are so nosey!) I've seen
them follow him across a creek, even. He likes doing it that way over
getting extra riders and 'hurrahing' them. Yearlings are strange creatures,
alright.

Good story, Soapweed. Amazing what happens when you work with
the cattle as opposed to doing it the 'human way.' Sorry about the
feed salesman... :p

For the record, it wasn't a Vigortone salesman. :wink: :)
 

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