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LazyWP

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Maybe I am just dumb, but I have never heard of a Sand footed cow. What do you mean by that?
 

McGee213288

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She had a bit of foot rot in her right rear foot last year.... it had to be treated twice...so it was prolly sore for bout 30 days or so...She gimped along on the outside edge ....now the out side toe wants to grow long and curl across the other....and she sets on her heel...it is starting to make her gimp again....I have had it trimed...didn't help...she's a really nice good tempered young cow.... :cry:
 

burnt

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I have one exactly like you describe. Got her trimmed last spring and now it's grown back and she's sore. Should have shipped her with the rest of the culls last fall but she always raises a great calf.
 

leanin' H

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Foot troubles are right at the top of a list of things that gets a cow shipped out here. If they can't travel, then they can't range out on the ridges for native grass, travel a ways to water or trail worth a dang. Just too many cons to outweight the fact she's young to me. But you do what you think is best. :wink: :D
 
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Anonymous

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leanin' H said:
Foot troubles are right at the top of a list of things that gets a cow shipped out here. If they can't travel, then they can't range out on the ridges for native grass, travel a ways to water or trail worth a dang. Just too many cons to outweight the fact she's young to me. But you do what you think is best. :wink: :D

Same here- about the only feet I've ever trimmed were just so the weren't limping when they went thru the salebarn on their road to Mickie D's....
 
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Anonymous

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what was that old ad for the quick-connect/release (buckle) rubber boot they made for horses that lost a shoe ?

"get an easy-boot or get a sense of humour" ? ? ?

...wonder if they make them things for cloven-hooved critters ? ? ?
 

Jinglebob

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Oldtimer said:
leanin' H said:
Foot troubles are right at the top of a list of things that gets a cow shipped out here. If they can't travel, then they can't range out on the ridges for native grass, travel a ways to water or trail worth a dang. Just too many cons to outweight the fact she's young to me. But you do what you think is best. :wink: :D

Same here- about the only feet I've ever trimmed were just so the weren't limping when they went thru the salebarn on their road to Mickie D's....

Well.... that's a nice liberal attitude. :wink: :eek: :D :twisted:
 

mytfarms

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Or you can do what me and every other guy who have access to trim chutes (and have heifers worth a small fortune) do every year. Trim them at least twice a year (or on a regular schedule) and baby the pen they live in. We have a bull with a similar problem, but a little rest on a soft corral gets him back in shape. It also depends quite a little on who you have trimming and what they know about fixing how the weight of the animal hits the foot. Over exaggerating the trim job can help the foot heal back into a more natural position. Essentially, it becomes like corrective shoeing on a horse.
 

Big Muddy rancher

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mytfarms said:
Or you can do what me and every other guy who have access to trim chutes (and have heifers worth a small fortune) do every year. Trim them at least twice a year (or on a regular schedule) and baby the pen they live in. We have a bull with a similar problem, but a little rest on a soft corral gets him back in shape. It also depends quite a little on who you have trimming and what they know about fixing how the weight of the animal hits the foot. Over exaggerating the trim job can help the foot heal back into a more natural position. Essentially, it becomes like corrective shoeing on a horse.

If a hfr has bad feet why would she be worth a fortune? :?
 

RSL

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We trim feet around here. The best way is to start at the animal's head, move back about 6 inches and start trimming... :lol:
A cow that can't walk is a TOAD (Teats On A Duck Useless), and it takes a lot of years to breed foot problems out of a cow herd.
 

Silver

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Well now there is quite a difference between a cow that's had foot rot, frozen foot, foot injury etc. and a cow that has inherited genetically poor feet and one shouldn't just lump them all together as one and the same.
 
A

Anonymous

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Jinglebob said:
Oldtimer said:
leanin' H said:
Foot troubles are right at the top of a list of things that gets a cow shipped out here. If they can't travel, then they can't range out on the ridges for native grass, travel a ways to water or trail worth a dang. Just too many cons to outweight the fact she's young to me. But you do what you think is best. :wink: :D

Same here- about the only feet I've ever trimmed were just so the weren't limping when they went thru the salebarn on their road to Mickie D's....

Well.... that's a nice liberal attitude. :wink: :eek: :D :twisted:

JBob-- I wonder why you consider this a liberal attitude... To me this is the only attitude any real rancher/breeder/cattleman should have with bad footed cows... :???:
If you have claw toes laming up a cow- have the opportunity to trim them- DO it so the cow will make it till the calf is weaned or will walk thru the ring good on their way to Mickie D's-- have at it... As far as I know they do't eat the hoofs ... :???:
Usually with my low input management now- I do nothing- but in years past when chasing the "Bull of the Month" AI fads had so many gimping cows that I had to.....

One of the reasons 10+ years ago I went against the "Bull of the Month" fad bloodlines the AI pimps promote- bulls which according to many folks that see them often tell me they have to trim feet on regularly at the bull studs in order for them to walk- but promoted for their high carcass qualitys or whatever :roll: .....

All the fancy carcass data in the world means nothing- if their progeny can't survive/thrive in a real world enviroment....
The reason anything I have with foot problems goes to the Stockyards- sold as culls ......
 

Jinglebob

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Oldtimer said:
Jinglebob said:
Oldtimer said:
Same here- about the only feet I've ever trimmed were just so the weren't limping when they went thru the salebarn on their road to Mickie D's....

Well.... that's a nice liberal attitude. :wink: :eek: :D :twisted:

JBob-- I wonder why you consider this a liberal attitude... To me this is the only attitude any real rancher/breeder/cattleman should have with bad footed cows... :???:
If you have claw toes laming up a cow- have the opportunity to trim them- DO it so the cow will make it till the calf is weaned or will walk thru the ring good on their way to Mickie D's-- have at it... As far as I know they do't eat the hoofs ... :???:
Usually with my low input management now- I do nothing- but in years past when chasing the "Bull of the Month" AI fads had so many gimping cows that I had to.....

One of the reasons 10+ years ago I went against the "Bull of the Month" fad bloodlines the AI pimps promote- bulls which according to many folks that see them often tell me they have to trim feet on regularly at the bull studs in order for them to walk- but promoted for their high carcass qualitys or whatever :roll: .....

All the fancy carcass data in the world means nothing- if their progeny can't survive/thrive in a real world enviroment....
The reason anything I have with foot problems goes to the Stockyards- sold as culls ......
OT, it was a joke. Maybe a poor one, but a joke none the less.

Yes, sore footed cows need to be fixed so they can go to the sale barn, and their calf too. No matter how good they look. I've never seen anyone doctoring on a deers feet. And come to think of it, I've never noticed a deer with a bad foot other than shot off or crippled. and seems like they got culled. Hmmm, maybe Mother Nature knows what she's doing? :eek:
 
A

Anonymous

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Jinglebob said:
Oldtimer said:
Jinglebob said:
Well.... that's a nice liberal attitude. :wink: :eek: :D :twisted:

JBob-- I wonder why you consider this a liberal attitude... To me this is the only attitude any real rancher/breeder/cattleman should have with bad footed cows... :???:
If you have claw toes laming up a cow- have the opportunity to trim them- DO it so the cow will make it till the calf is weaned or will walk thru the ring good on their way to Mickie D's-- have at it... As far as I know they do't eat the hoofs ... :???:
Usually with my low input management now- I do nothing- but in years past when chasing the "Bull of the Month" AI fads had so many gimping cows that I had to.....

One of the reasons 10+ years ago I went against the "Bull of the Month" fad bloodlines the AI pimps promote- bulls which according to many folks that see them often tell me they have to trim feet on regularly at the bull studs in order for them to walk- but promoted for their high carcass qualitys or whatever :roll: .....

All the fancy carcass data in the world means nothing- if their progeny can't survive/thrive in a real world enviroment....
The reason anything I have with foot problems goes to the Stockyards- sold as culls ......
OT, it was a joke. Maybe a poor one, but a joke none the less.

Yes, sore footed cows need to be fixed so they can go to the sale barn, and their calf too. No matter how good they look. I've never seen anyone doctoring on a deers feet. And come to think of it, I've never noticed a deer with a bad foot other than shot off or crippled. and seems like they got culled. Hmmm, maybe Mother Nature knows what she's doing? :eek:

AMEN---"It's not nice to try and fool Mother Nature."-- but that is what some breeders have been doing for years.... :(
 

mytfarms

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Big Muddy rancher said:
mytfarms said:
Or you can do what me and every other guy who have access to trim chutes (and have heifers worth a small fortune) do every year. Trim them at least twice a year (or on a regular schedule) and baby the pen they live in. We have a bull with a similar problem, but a little rest on a soft corral gets him back in shape. It also depends quite a little on who you have trimming and what they know about fixing how the weight of the animal hits the foot. Over exaggerating the trim job can help the foot heal back into a more natural position. Essentially, it becomes like corrective shoeing on a horse.

If a hfr has bad feet why would she be worth a fortune? :?

Cause they look like a perfect female every time they set foot in the ring. Here we're talking about fixing on a cow that was unfortunate enough to get foot rot. Although that may be a genetic pre disposal, it's probably not a highly heritable issue whereas actual bone structure issues are a very heritable problem and a major issue. If a little trimming can save a good cow and keep her cranking $900 calves, it might just be worth it in this market.
 

per

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mytfarms said:
Big Muddy rancher said:
mytfarms said:
Or you can do what me and every other guy who have access to trim chutes (and have heifers worth a small fortune) do every year. Trim them at least twice a year (or on a regular schedule) and baby the pen they live in. We have a bull with a similar problem, but a little rest on a soft corral gets him back in shape. It also depends quite a little on who you have trimming and what they know about fixing how the weight of the animal hits the foot. Over exaggerating the trim job can help the foot heal back into a more natural position. Essentially, it becomes like corrective shoeing on a horse.

If a hfr has bad feet why would she be worth a fortune? :?

Cause they look like a perfect female every time they set foot in the ring. Here we're talking about fixing on a cow that was unfortunate enough to get foot rot. Although that may be a genetic pre disposal, it's probably not a highly heritable issue whereas actual bone structure issues are a very heritable problem and a major issue. If a little trimming can save a good cow and keep her cranking $900 calves, it might just be worth it in this market.
This is why some Pure bred folks loose credibility. Masking instead of culling will destroy your reputation as far as the commercial end user is concerned myt. Anything that has ever been tipped here is also culled and the tip is a short term bandaid to the trim behind the head solution.
 

gcreekrch

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mytfarms said:
Big Muddy rancher said:
mytfarms said:
Or you can do what me and every other guy who have access to trim chutes (and have heifers worth a small fortune) do every year. Trim them at least twice a year (or on a regular schedule) and baby the pen they live in. We have a bull with a similar problem, but a little rest on a soft corral gets him back in shape. It also depends quite a little on who you have trimming and what they know about fixing how the weight of the animal hits the foot. Over exaggerating the trim job can help the foot heal back into a more natural position. Essentially, it becomes like corrective shoeing on a horse.

If a hfr has bad feet why would she be worth a fortune? :?

Cause they look like a perfect female every time they set foot in the ring. Here we're talking about fixing on a cow that was unfortunate enough to get foot rot. Although that may be a genetic pre disposal, it's probably not a highly heritable issue whereas actual bone structure issues are a very heritable problem and a major issue. If a little trimming can save a good cow and keep her cranking $900 calves, it might just be worth it in this market.

Even though most of us are guilty of doing something to make our charge's more comfortable it is never "worth it" to propogate a known "defect" into our herds. There are a lot of cattle that recover from severe footrot without having the hoof deformed.

Genetic superiority?
 

Big Muddy rancher

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mytfarms said:
Big Muddy rancher said:
mytfarms said:
Or you can do what me and every other guy who have access to trim chutes (and have heifers worth a small fortune) do every year. Trim them at least twice a year (or on a regular schedule) and baby the pen they live in. We have a bull with a similar problem, but a little rest on a soft corral gets him back in shape. It also depends quite a little on who you have trimming and what they know about fixing how the weight of the animal hits the foot. Over exaggerating the trim job can help the foot heal back into a more natural position. Essentially, it becomes like corrective shoeing on a horse.

If a hfr has bad feet why would she be worth a fortune? :?

Cause they look like a perfect female every time they set foot in the ring. Here we're talking about fixing on a cow that was unfortunate enough to get foot rot. Although that may be a genetic pre disposal, it's probably not a highly heritable issue whereas actual bone structure issues are a very heritable problem and a major issue. If a little trimming can save a good cow and keep her cranking $900 calves, it might just be worth it in this market.

Well a bull spending time in a soft corral doesn't breed many cows on The Circle Y ranch.

Also when you trim animals feet twice a year how do you know your not masking inheritable foot problems?
 

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