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No Co-mingling of Canadian Beef

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Anonymous

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Today 4/13/2005 6:29:00 PM


R-Calf Cattle Update: McDonnell Says That They Don’t Want Canadian Beef Co-Mingled



(Billings, Mont.) – Going into effect on Saturday is an official agreement between the United States and Taiwan that will allow the U.S. to begin shipments of boneless beef to that nation, a customer that had been the sixth largest market for U.S. beef before an import ban on all U.S. beef, live cattle and related products was imposed in 2003, after a BSE-positive cow of Canadian origin was discovered in Washington state.



“Just like Egypt – a nation that reopened its market to U.S. beef in recent days – Taiwan is emphatic that it wants only beef derived from cattle younger than 30 months of age, slaughtered in the United States,” McDonnell said. “And while product from third countries can be exported to Taiwan – those countries have to be eligible to export to Taiwan – which indicates the Taiwanese do not want any beef from countries affected by BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy).



“That means they don’t want Canadian beef co-mingled with our U.S. exports,” McDonnell emphasized. “We’re happy Taiwan and Egypt are back on board as export customers, and we’re also glad they’re not caving in to political pressures from Washington.”



The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has argued in its Final Rule on BSE minimal-risk regions that lifting the ban on Canadian imports would help convince other countries of the safety of both U.S. beef and Canadian beef.



“Let’s put things in perspective,” McDonnell continued. “Our export customers are demanding more risk mitigation measures of U.S. exports than what USDA’s Final Rule – if implemented – would require if Canadian beef were allowed into the United States. Common sense tells you that USDA could very well be jeopardizing these new trade agreements with Egypt and Taiwan, and future agreements with other countries, if the Final Rule is put in place. Fortunately, the current injunction against USDA has reassured our foreign customers that U.S. producers are serious about maintaining our historically conservative firewalls to keep BSE out of the United States.”



Taiwan requires that certain Specified Risk Materials (SRMs) be excluded from U.S. beef products exported to Taiwan: brain, skull, eyes, trigeminal ganglia, spinal cord, most parts of the vertebral column, dorsal root ganglia, tonsils, and the distal ileum of the small intestine – even from cattle under 30 months of age.



“USDA’s Final Rule would allow all Canadian beef products from cattle 30 months of age and younger to be imported into the United States,” McDonnell pointed out. “The only restriction in the Final Rule on SRMs requires that just the tonsils and small intestines be removed. All other SRMs would be allowed, and segregation of older cattle in slaughter or processing plants is not required in the Final Rule at all.”



Taiwan prefers that the U.S. slaughter plants producing the beef for export be dedicated exclusively to production of beef products from animal younger than 30 months of age, and that do not use imported beef products. For Taiwan to accept beef products from slaughter plants that do process older cattle and/or import beef products, those facilities must be registered participants in USDA Agriculture Marketing Service’s Beef Export Verification (BEV) program.



“If the United States were to accept beef from Canada, the U.S. would automatically have lower food-safety standards than what our export customers demand on the U.S. beef they want to consume,” said McDonnell. “For USDA to continue to disregard the product demands of our foreign customers is irresponsible, and the agency is not only risking the possibility of keeping other export markets closed in the near-term, but also jeopardizing the United States’ long-term ability to export to any countries at all.



“R-CALF has said all along that it doesn’t make sense to believe that countries will readily reopen their borders to U.S. beef just because the USDA decides to lower its import standards for countries known to have BSE – specifically Canada – and thereby, increasing the risk of exposure to BSE,” he concluded.
 

Les

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good for the Usa and good for canada the more usa export the more canada can ship to the usa in boxes
 

Silver

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Anyone have any idea who the U.S. will export more beef to this year; Canada or Taiwan? And what about US cattle exports? Although one WOULD wonder why the Canadian govt. is still allowing beef from an obviously substandard system to come north...
As far as comingling goes, R-CALF's pet COOL should take care of that.... unless of course todays mandate is different than yesterdays. But they wouldn't flip flop would they?
 

smalltime

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My uess is it will be the country with the most cash and demand .only the canadian govern ment can answer the second question.YYYYou are right cool shold take care of it and no.
 

Manitoba_Rancher

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OT,

You must not have watched the CBC last night. I think you buggers have a bigger problem than we do. Your just hiding it better. And you can not tell me those cattle shown on the video tape didnt BSE. Why were animals like this even allowed to be taken to a slaughter facility? I am so sick an tired of R-weasel trashing Canadian beef and then sitting back and saying "wut we didnt say your beef was full of disease". There is a few wet stinkin rats running R-calf and they will get there lesson taught to them when the time is right!
 

Kato

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news release
PROGRESS CONTINUES IN ASIAN MARKETS FOR CANADIAN BEEF
OTTAWA, November 12, 2004 - A very important step has been achieved towards the re-opening of a key Asian market. Taiwan has confirmed its intention to conditionally grant Canada access for boneless beef and committed to send a technical team for a first-hand look at Canada's food safety and animal health measures. Results from that visit could lead to a re-opening of the Taiwanese market in the near future.

"The continued progress being made in Asia is extremely positive for the Canadian beef industry," said Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Andy Mitchell. "It is a reflection of the intense efforts and ongoing discussions taking place to re-enforce the stringent measures we have in place to ensure the safety of our beef."

A Taiwanese Department of Health committee looking at the issue commended the food safety measures Canada has put in place, and cited Canada's animal feed controls, BSE surveillance program and cattle identification/traceability system as key factors in its recommendation. As part of the process of market opening, inspectors from Taiwan will visit Canada to tour packing plants, a slaughterhouse, a feed mill, a cattle ranch and a testing facility conducting BSE surveillance. They will also receive an on-site explanation of Canada's cattle identification system.

Prior to Taiwan's ban on imports of Canadian beef, Taiwan was Canada's fifth largest export market for beef and one of our fastest-growing markets. In 2002, Canadian exports of beef to Taiwan totaled almost $20 million.

The planned visit by Taiwanese inspectors follows a similar inspection mission conducted by Hong Kong officials in late October as part of their process to reconsider their current import restrictions. Hong Kong officials are currently reviewing results of that mission.

Progress is also being made in Japan. A recent meeting between Canadian and Japanese officials in Tokyo reconfirmed their commitment to continue technical-level discussions and exchanges of information aimed at starting two-way trade in beef and beef products. Japan also reconfirmed that when a final decision is made on resumption of trade in beef from North America, the same conditions will apply to both Canada and the United States.

Expanding access to export markets for beef and other animal products is a key element of the Repositioning the Livestock Industry Strategy announced on September 10. Since that time, the Government of Canada has made important inroads in Asia, including the signing of two protocols with China during a visit by Minister Mitchell in October. Those protocols will facilitate the re-opening of that market for Canadian bovine semen and embryos.

:D
 

Sandhusker

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"The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has argued in its Final Rule on BSE minimal-risk regions that lifting the ban on Canadian imports would help convince other countries of the safety of both U.S. beef and Canadian beef. "

I'd like to know why the USDA would be concerned that other counties view Canadian beef as safe. Kinda tips their cards a little bit.
 

Tam

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Could be Sandhusker that most countries see the U.S. and Canada as the same so if the U.S see us as safe then that means U.S. beef is safe. Or did you forget that both the U.S. and Canada are MINIMAL RISK :???:
 

SASH

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Just keep up those lies Leo.

Taiwan To Lift Ban on Cdn Beef - But No Date Set - Ag Cda




Winnipeg, MB, Apr 13, 2005 (Resource News International via COMTEX) -- Taiwan told Canadian agriculture officials that they would open their border to Canadian beef "soon," confirmed a Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada official.

Greg Giokas, Director of Trade Policy with Ag Canada was in Taiwan Monday as part of a group meeting with the country's minister of Agriculture and Health. At the time the Canadians were told that the reopening of the border to Canadian beef "can be expected very soon," said Giokas. However, no date was set, he added.

Giokas said the Taiwan Department of Health will now make the recommendation to the government.

While no date is set, "the reassuring thing is that they are committed to opening," said Giokas. He added that there do not appear to be any technical problems.

Prior to Canada's first discovery of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in May 2003, Taiwan was one of the top five markets for Canadian beef, said Giokas. He said opening the Taiwan market was very significant as it helps in encouraging other markets to open.

"We are very optimistic that Taiwan will once again open its borders to Canadian beef," said Cam Daniels, Vice-President of the Canada Beef Export Federation.

Daniels indicated that Taiwan was a priority market for Canada's beef. During calendar year 2002, Canada shipped 8,000 metric tons of beef to Taiwan, of which 95% to 98% consisted of muscle cuts. Shipments of Canadian beef to Taiwan before the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease in May of 2003, had been on pace to top the 2002 level. Beef shipments from Canada to Taiwan from January to May in 2003 had totaled 3,672 metric tons.

No official time frame was given by Daniels as to when the negotiation process would conclude, but there was hope that shipments could resume within the next couple of months.

"If Taiwan opens its border by the summer of 2005, it is believed Canadian beef exports to that country would be able to hit the 4,500 metric ton level by the end of the year," Daniels forecast.
 
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Anonymous

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SASH said:
Just keep up those lies Leo.

Taiwan To Lift Ban on Cdn Beef - But No Date Set - Ag Cda




Winnipeg, MB, Apr 13, 2005 (Resource News International via COMTEX) -- Taiwan told Canadian agriculture officials that they would open their border to Canadian beef "soon," confirmed a Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada official.

Greg Giokas, Director of Trade Policy with Ag Canada was in Taiwan Monday as part of a group meeting with the country's minister of Agriculture and Health. At the time the Canadians were told that the reopening of the border to Canadian beef "can be expected very soon," said Giokas. However, no date was set, he added.

Giokas said the Taiwan Department of Health will now make the recommendation to the government.

While no date is set, "the reassuring thing is that they are committed to opening," said Giokas. He added that there do not appear to be any technical problems.

Prior to Canada's first discovery of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in May 2003, Taiwan was one of the top five markets for Canadian beef, said Giokas. He said opening the Taiwan market was very significant as it helps in encouraging other markets to open.

"We are very optimistic that Taiwan will once again open its borders to Canadian beef," said Cam Daniels, Vice-President of the Canada Beef Export Federation.

Daniels indicated that Taiwan was a priority market for Canada's beef. During calendar year 2002, Canada shipped 8,000 metric tons of beef to Taiwan, of which 95% to 98% consisted of muscle cuts. Shipments of Canadian beef to Taiwan before the outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease in May of 2003, had been on pace to top the 2002 level. Beef shipments from Canada to Taiwan from January to May in 2003 had totaled 3,672 metric tons.

No official time frame was given by Daniels as to when the negotiation process would conclude, but there was hope that shipments could resume within the next couple of months.

"If Taiwan opens its border by the summer of 2005, it is believed Canadian beef exports to that country would be able to hit the 4,500 metric ton level by the end of the year," Daniels forecast.

Sash--If they're not taking Canadian beef on April 16th- It isn't a lie.....And what is meant by "soon"?.... USDA has used "soon" with the Japanese for the last year and half........
 
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Anonymous

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Tam said:
Could be Sandhusker that most countries see the U.S. and Canada as the same so if the U.S see us as safe then that means U.S. beef is safe. Or did you forget that both the U.S. and Canada are MINIMAL RISK :???:

Maybe in the eyes of Canadians we are the same- but that didn't come about until after May 2003 :? ....
 

SASH

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Sash--If they're not taking Canadian beef on April 16th- It isn't a lie.....And what is meant by "soon"?.... USDA has used "soon" with the Japanese for the last year and half........

Yeah, we don't get out the thumbscrews quite as quick as the US on these issues. It'll open to us very shortly after it opens to you. Lets not forget that the US also said the Japanese market was opening right away even though the Japanese never said any such thing.
 

Les

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your right oldtimer canada and the usa are not the same. Canada doesn`t have terrist threats issued all the time like the usa does. We can sleep at night knowing the likely hood of us getting blowen up is minnimal.
we are a minnimal risk country when it comes to terrist. Unlike a high risk like the usa.
 

Sandhusker

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Tam said:
Could be Sandhusker that most countries see the U.S. and Canada as the same so if the U.S see us as safe then that means U.S. beef is safe. Or did you forget that both the U.S. and Canada are MINIMAL RISK :???:

If most countries see the US and Canada as the same, why did the doors shut to us in December instead of May?
 

Tommy

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Sandhusker...If most countries see the US and Canada as the same, why did the doors shut to us in December instead of May?

The NCBA used to say it was a North American Beef Industry, that was untill a lot of their members raised hell about it. Now it is mostly Canadians that say it.
 

Silver

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Tommy said:
Sandhusker...If most countries see the US and Canada as the same, why did the doors shut to us in December instead of May?

The NCBA used to say it was a North American Beef Industry, that was untill a lot of their members raised hell about it. Now it is mostly Canadians that say it.

And in light of recent news, I would think that Canadians won't be saying it anymore either.
 

frenchie

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Sandhusker said:
Tam said:
Could be Sandhusker that most countries see the U.S. and Canada as the same so if the U.S see us as safe then that means U.S. beef is safe. Or did you forget that both the U.S. and Canada are MINIMAL RISK :???:



If most countries see the US and Canada as the same, why did the doors shut to us in December instead of May?

If they did not group you with us ...why did they shut the door at all?
 

Sandhusker

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frenchie said:
Sandhusker said:
Tam said:
Could be Sandhusker that most countries see the U.S. and Canada as the same so if the U.S see us as safe then that means U.S. beef is safe. Or did you forget that both the U.S. and Canada are MINIMAL RISK :???:



If most countries see the US and Canada as the same, why did the doors shut to us in December instead of May?

If they did not group you with us ...why did they shut the door at all?

It's because most countries have a zero tolerance for BSE. We used to until the AMI informed the USDA that this policy would cost them money.....
 

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