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What is the Repub Direction?

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Anonymous

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Which ONE of these issues mattered most in deciding how you voted today? (CHECK ONLY ONE) Total


Abortion 6% -
Federal budget deficit 30%
The economy 49%
Illegal immigration 13%

----------------------

Question-- IF this FOX Arizona exit poll is close to being correct and any indication of the feelings of Repub voters- and the economy and deficit are the most important issue to Repub voters-- why are so many of the candidates avoiding those issues and instead centering on the social issues (abortion, gay rights, contraception, immigration, etc..) :???:
Issues that they lose many moderate and independent voters on...

Is it because they don't have an answer to the economy problems :???:

Or is it because they don't want to remind the voters that they were the Party at the helm- that ran up the Trillions in debts with their drunken sailor spending- including war debts (while promising voters it would cost nothing)-and bank bailouts and that just a short 4 years ago brought on the biggest recession/depression (Bush Bust) in 80 years.. :???:
 

Larrry

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you really don't get it do you.

If you haven't figured it out yet, there isn't much reason to explain it to you because you'll miss it again.

If we outlaw "dope" where would ot go
 

Mike

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Redundant BS.............................................

Wonder if he ever had an original thought? :roll:
 

hypocritexposer

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Asked by CBS "This Morning" host Charlie Rose if the recent focus on social issues in the GOP race was "troubling," Ryan said that he was not concerned about attempts from "the media and maybe the Democrats to move it in that direction."


"I think what these candidates are mostly talking about are the fiscal issues, the economic issues and the choice of two futures that the country's going to have to make in the fall," Ryan said. "When it all comes down to it, I think, we're going to be really talking about the economic issues which are the driving issues of the front of the minds of the American people. So I don't think we're going to have a sidetrack into social issues."


"They've been fantastic on spending; they've been fantastic on entitlements; and they're now advancing really good pro-growth economic policies," Ryan said. "So as far as I'm concerned, no matter who emerges from this primary season — which might take awhile — we're going to have a sharp contrast about what it takes to get this country growing and about reclaiming American exceptionalism with the president, and I'm comfortable with the direction that both these campaigns are headed."


Video of CBS interview at link:

http://thehill.com/video/campaign/212947-paul-ryan-gop-candidates-wont-be-sidetracked-by-social-issues
 

Clarencen

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I'll vote Republican because the Democrates plan will destroy the country.

The Democrates want to shut down manufacturing, they want to shut down mineing, they want to shut down agriculture, and most everything else because they believe this is changing the environment. They want to put all who work in these industries on welfare. They want to shut off our production of energy, They believe they can replace it with solar and wind. We are 30 years or more away from the tecnology to do that, then would need to produce steel and other things to built grides and transmission lines to get electricity to where we need it. There are to many things the Democrats have never thought through.
 

hopalong

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Too bad oldtimer does not get it!! too many drinks has cooked his brain
 

hypocritexposer

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Rick Santorum, running under the slogan “the True Conservative,” may seem an odd match with a Trenton attorney often referred to as a “prominent New Jersey Democrat.”

But Lionel “Lonny” Kaplan is urging fellow Jews to look past Santorum’s views on abortion, contraception, and religion and consider the Republican candidate’s views on Israel and, especially, his proposals for fixing a troubled economy.


“I think this election is about a new direction for our economy and a new direction for our foreign policy, particularly in the Middle East, and he is a good one to do it,” said Kaplan. “Obviously, Israel is a big consideration for me — but it is not the only consideration — and he is someone Israel can rely on.”


http://www.njjewishnews.com/article/8531/trenton-democrat-urges-support-for-rick-santorum#.T06CmfU7_IU
 

Steve

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Question-- IF this FOX Arizona exit poll is close to being correct and any indication of the feelings of Repub voters- and the economy and deficit are the most important issue to Repub voters-- why are so many of the candidates avoiding those issues and instead centering on the social issues (abortion, gay rights, contraception, immigration, etc..)

it is not the candidates who are focusing on these issues..

because the liberal media that is constantly asking and going back to these issues.. because they can deflect from Obama's poor record on all issues..

listening to the debates soon became tedious due to the media and the debate hosts inability to actually focus on anything but the social issues..

they know it is the only way Obama can win if they make out all conservatives to be religious zealots..
 

Steve

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Is it because they don't have an answer to the economy problems

Santorum has laid out several plans.. I have not only posted some on here, but posted links to his website...

I would post them again.. but I doubt you would really care or even read them.. .but for the rest of the ranchers..



MADE IN AMERICA: EMPOWERING AMERICAN FAMILIES, BUILDING ECONOMIC FREEDOM

Cut and simplify personal income taxes by cutting the number of tax rates to just two - 10% and 28% returning to the Reagan era pro-growth top tax rate

Simplify the tax code and reduce middle income taxes by eliminating the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT)

Simplify the tax code, encourage savings and investment and reduce taxes by eliminating the Death Tax

Lower the Capital Gains and Dividend tax rates to 12% to spur economic growth and investment

Reduce taxes for families by tripling the personal deduction for each child

Reduce and simplify taxes for families by eliminating marriage tax penalties throughout the federal tax code

Retain deductions for charitable giving, home mortgage interest, healthcare, retirement savings, and children

Cut the corporate income tax rate in half to make our businesses competitive around the world, from 35% to 17.5%

Eliminate the corporate income tax for manufacturers - from 35% to 0% - which will spur middle income job creation in the United States and will create a job multiplier effect for workers

Spur innovation in America by increasing the Research & Development Tax Credit from 14% to 20% and make it permanent

Eliminate the tax on repatriated taxable corporate income - from 35% from 0% - when manufacturers invest in plant and equipment; and reduce the corporate tax rate from 35% to 5.25% on other repatriated income and allow for 100% expensing for new business equipment

Repeal and Replace ObamaCare with market based healthcare innovation and competition to improve America and America's health and create jobs;

Reduce Federal (non-defense discretionary spending) to 2008 levels through across the board spending cuts;

Eliminate all agriculture and energy subsidies within four years letting the markets work, eliminate resources for job killing radical regulatory approaches at the EPA and refocus its mission on safe and clean water and air and commonsense conservation, eliminate funding for Planned Parenthood and support adoption, reduce funding for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) for extreme positions undermining economic freedom, eliminate funding for implementation of ObamaCare, and eliminate funding for United Nations organizations that undermine America's interests

Pass a Balanced Budget Amendment to the Constitution capping government spending at 18% of GDP

Support Legislation to Reform the Congressional Budget Process and support legislation that requires Congress to pass constitutionally required spending bills or forfeit its members' pay for the next fiscal year

Eliminate all other Obama era regulations with economic impact over $100 million

Negotiate 5 Free Trade Agreements and submit to Congress in first year of Presidency

Tap into America's vast domestic energy resources to power our 21st century economy without picking winners and losers so all American families and businesses can have lower energy cost

Unleash innovation in telecommunications and Internet consumer options by getting government out of the way which will expand productivity and lower costs

Reform Social Security and Medicare for sustainable retirements

Block Grant Medicaid, Housing, Job Training, and other social services to the States

Freeze current non-defense related federal worker pay levels for a year and reduce federal workforce by at least 10% with no compensatory increase in the contract workforce

Secure our border, streamline the legal immigration process to attract highly skilled talent and entrepreneurs from around the world and reform the agriculture worker program so it works for America's farmers

Reclaim the role of parents as the decision makers in their children's education and incentivize the states to promote parental choice and quality educational options because the family is the foundation of the economy

Promote tort reform and alternatives to litigation for federal policies and programs; and incentivize the states to expand these reforms across our economy

Approve the Keystone Pipeline and other job creating initiatives delayed and burdened excessively by government regulation

Overturn the National Labor Relations decision preventing Boeing from opening up its airplane factory in South Carolina and prevent other decisions like it

Phase out Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's government backed role in mortgages and homeownership within five years

Audit the Federal Reserve and return it to its original purpose - a single charter to only manage inflation

Strengthen our national security and national defense so that we are not dependent upon our foes or competitors for critical manufacturing, technology, energy and other security needs
 
A

Anonymous

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In GOP circles, some wonder whether the party needs to lose big to eventually win



By Chris Cillizza, Published: March 4
In “Batman Begins” — the 2005 movie about the origins of the caped crusader — there is a group of villains who believe the city of Gotham is beyond saving and that the only way to fix it is to first destroy it.

As the Republican presidential race has worn on (and on), there are some within the party wondering — privately, of course — whether the only way for the party to face the growing divide between its moderate and conservative wings is for the 2012 election to be its Gotham moment.

“I’d personally enjoy all the ‘we can’t nominate another Republican In Name Only’ crowd getting a stomping by an incumbent with an 8.5 unemployment rate,” said one senior party strategist, granted anonymity to speak candidly, warning of nominating a strictly conservative candidate like former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum.

It’s happened before. In 1964, conservatives got their way when Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater beat out New York Gov. — and proud moderate — Nelson Rockefeller for the Republican nomination. Goldwater’s conservatism didn’t sit well with the country at large and Johnson won with 61 percent of the vote, the largest popular vote percentage in modern history.

Four years later, Republicans — showing their lesson learned — nominated establishment favorite and political pragmatist Richard Nixon. (Nixon had been defeated by John Kennedy in 1960 and declined to run in 1964.) Nixon ended eight years of Democratic control of the White House when he beat Vice President Hubert Humphrey in the 1968 election.

Conservative columnist George F. Will evoked the 1964 comparison himself when writing about Santorum and former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney — the GOP race’s two front-runners — in a recent column. Wrote Will: “Both are conservatives, although of strikingly different stripes. Neither, however, seems likely to be elected. Neither has demonstrated, or seems likely to develop, an aptitude for energizing a national coalition that translates into 270 electoral votes.”

Will’s advice was for conservatives to focus their energy (and, presumably, their money) on retaining control of the U.S. House and retaking control of the U.S. Senate. But such gains might not force the top-to-bottom reevaluation that many in the party believe Republicans need to undergo to win future national elections.

“Gone are the days when the Republican Party used to put forth big, bold, visionary stuff,” former Utah governor and 2012 GOP presidential candidate Jon Huntsman Jr. said late last month in an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” (Huntsman, who endorsed Romney after dropping from the race, has also advocated for a third party of late. “I think we’re going to have problems politically until we get some sort of third party movement or some voice out there that can put forth new ideas,” he said in that same MSNBC interview.)

The GOP’s problem, according to party insiders, is most evident when it comes to the issue of immigration. All of the major Republican presidential candidates — with the exception of former House speaker Newt Gingrich — have largely rejected the idea of a path to citizenship for the 11 million people in the United States illegally.

That view has contributed to a broader sense among Hispanic voters that the Republican Party is not a friendly place for them. In the 2008 election, President Obama won the Hispanic vote nationwide with 67 percent of the vote. Given that more than half of the total growth in U.S. population over the past decade came in the Hispanic community, Republicans simply can’t afford to keep losing this largest minority group 65 percent to 35 percent and have a fighting chance of winning national elections in four or eight years’ time.

While some within the party have begun to believe that the only way for the GOP to truly heal is to first bottom out, most strategists don’t see 2012 shaping up that way — particularly if the establishment-friendly Romney winds up as the nominee.

“They won’t get it this year, as Romney is viewed as too moderate, so blame will go to moderates,” said former Virginia representative Tom Davis, himself a leading moderate voice within the GOP. “The narrative will be McCain and Mitt are too much like Obama.”

Mark Salter, McCain’s longtime consigliere and a lead strategist during the Arizona senator’s 2000 and 2008 presidential bids, agreed that no matter the results this November, it will almost certainly not trigger a 1964-like reassessment of the party.

“Losses are interpreted through the prism of people’s convictions,” said Salter. “If Republicans lose the next election badly, which would be unfortunate for a whole lot of reasons, conservatives will blame it on a nominee who wasn’t conservative enough, and the center-right and moderates will blame it on the purists.”

The question many Republican strategists are asking themselves at the moment is whether — in 2012, 2016 or even 2020 — it’s worth taking one step back in order to, hopefully, take two steps forward.
 

Steve

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w In GOP circles, some wonder whether the party needs to lose big to eventually win



as if the McCain loss wasn't big enough.. some GOP.. want to lose by a bigger margin..
 

flounder

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Oldtimer said:
Which ONE of these issues mattered most in deciding how you voted today? (CHECK ONLY ONE) Total


Abortion 6% -
Federal budget deficit 30%
The economy 49%
Illegal immigration 13%

----------------------

Question-- IF this FOX Arizona exit poll is close to being correct and any indication of the feelings of Repub voters- and the economy and deficit are the most important issue to Repub voters-- why are so many of the candidates avoiding those issues and instead centering on the social issues (abortion, gay rights, contraception, immigration, etc..) :???:
Issues that they lose many moderate and independent voters on...

Is it because they don't have an answer to the economy problems :???:

Or is it because they don't want to remind the voters that they were the Party at the helm- that ran up the Trillions in debts with their drunken sailor spending- including war debts (while promising voters it would cost nothing)-and bank bailouts and that just a short 4 years ago brought on the biggest recession/depression (Bush Bust) in 80 years.. :???:




ASK RUSH, he's your leader :nod: :tiphat: :wave: :lol: :lol2:
 

flounder

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flounder said:
Oldtimer said:
Which ONE of these issues mattered most in deciding how you voted today? (CHECK ONLY ONE) Total


Abortion 6% -
Federal budget deficit 30%
The economy 49%
Illegal immigration 13%

----------------------

Question-- IF this FOX Arizona exit poll is close to being correct and any indication of the feelings of Repub voters- and the economy and deficit are the most important issue to Repub voters-- why are so many of the candidates avoiding those issues and instead centering on the social issues (abortion, gay rights, contraception, immigration, etc..) :???:
Issues that they lose many moderate and independent voters on...

Is it because they don't have an answer to the economy problems :???:

Or is it because they don't want to remind the voters that they were the Party at the helm- that ran up the Trillions in debts with their drunken sailor spending- including war debts (while promising voters it would cost nothing)-and bank bailouts and that just a short 4 years ago brought on the biggest recession/depression (Bush Bust) in 80 years.. :???:




ASK RUSH, he's THEIR leader :nod: :tiphat: :wave: :lol: :lol2:
 
A

Anonymous

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Voters to GOP candidates: We don’t like any of you


Posted by Chris Cillizza and Aaron Blake at 07:00 AM ET, 03/06/2012


The four remaining Republican presidential candidates are viewed unfavorably by large swaths of the American public, according to a new Washington Post/ABC News poll — a sobering reminder for the party that the extended primary season has damaged the brand.

Among independent voters, who are widely seen as the critical swing voting bloc in the fall election, none of the four candidates is regarded favorably by even 40 percent of the sample.

Texas Rep. Ron Paul does best with a 38 percent favorable rating and a 35 percent unfavorable rating.
Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, the frontrunner in the race, clocks in at a dismal 32 percent favorable score, 16 points lower than the 48 percent of independents who see him in an unfavorable light. Ditto former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum who is viewed favorably by just just three in 10 independents. That looks positively outstanding when compared to the 21 percent — yes, 21 percent — of independents who view former House Speaker Newt Gingrich favorably.

(Want to take a guess at Gingrich’s favorability among Democrats? It’s 11 percent with 73 percent viewing him unfavorably. Yowza.)

The wear and tear of the protracted and nasty primary fight is even evident among Republican voters. Only Romney is regarded favorably by six in 10 self-identified GOPers. As interesting, about three in 10 Republicans view Romney unfavorably — indicative of the lingering discontent with him among some within the party.

Fifty-eight percent of GOPers regard Santorum favorably against 23 percent who have an unfavorable opinion. The numbers are far darker for both Gingrich and Santorum. Gingrich breaks just about even — 42 percent favorable/44 percent unfavorable — while Paul is viewed even more unfavorably (44 percent unfavorable compared to 38 percent favorable).

These numbers — like all poll numbers — are a snapshot in time. But, they reflect the fact that the recent debates within the Republican presidential primary (contraception, anyone?) are hurting — not helping — the GOP’s chances of regaining the White House in the fall.

It’s why there seems to be a growing desire from major pillars of the Republican establishment — see House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s endorsement of Romney over the weekend — to bring this primary fight to a close and begin the process of courting independents before they slip out of the nominee’s grasp.

The Post/ABC poll suggests that move to the ideological middle can’t happen soon enough for Republicans.

I agree with the article- the election will be in the hands of the nearly 40% of current US voters who are Independents...The reason an extremist from either side can't win- and that only Romney stands any chance of beating Obama...
 

okfarmer

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Oldtimer said:
Voters to GOP candidates: We don’t like any of you


Posted by Chris Cillizza and Aaron Blake at 07:00 AM ET, 03/06/2012


The four remaining Republican presidential candidates are viewed unfavorably by large swaths of the American public, according to a new Washington Post/ABC News poll — a sobering reminder for the party that the extended primary season has damaged the brand.

Among independent voters, who are widely seen as the critical swing voting bloc in the fall election, none of the four candidates is regarded favorably by even 40 percent of the sample.

Texas Rep. Ron Paul does best with a 38 percent favorable rating and a 35 percent unfavorable rating.
Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, the frontrunner in the race, clocks in at a dismal 32 percent favorable score, 16 points lower than the 48 percent of independents who see him in an unfavorable light. Ditto former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum who is viewed favorably by just just three in 10 independents. That looks positively outstanding when compared to the 21 percent — yes, 21 percent — of independents who view former House Speaker Newt Gingrich favorably.

(Want to take a guess at Gingrich’s favorability among Democrats? It’s 11 percent with 73 percent viewing him unfavorably. Yowza.)

The wear and tear of the protracted and nasty primary fight is even evident among Republican voters. Only Romney is regarded favorably by six in 10 self-identified GOPers. As interesting, about three in 10 Republicans view Romney unfavorably — indicative of the lingering discontent with him among some within the party.

Fifty-eight percent of GOPers regard Santorum favorably against 23 percent who have an unfavorable opinion. The numbers are far darker for both Gingrich and Santorum. Gingrich breaks just about even — 42 percent favorable/44 percent unfavorable — while Paul is viewed even more unfavorably (44 percent unfavorable compared to 38 percent favorable).

These numbers — like all poll numbers — are a snapshot in time. But, they reflect the fact that the recent debates within the Republican presidential primary (contraception, anyone?) are hurting — not helping — the GOP’s chances of regaining the White House in the fall.

It’s why there seems to be a growing desire from major pillars of the Republican establishment — see House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s endorsement of Romney over the weekend — to bring this primary fight to a close and begin the process of courting independents before they slip out of the nominee’s grasp.

The Post/ABC poll suggests that move to the ideological middle can’t happen soon enough for Republicans.

I agree with the article- the election will be in the hands of the nearly 40% of current US voters who are Independents...The reason an extremist from either side can't win- and that only Romney stands any chance of beating Obama...

Keep telling yourself that if it helps you sleep at night.
 

Larrry

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The thing is obama is EXTREME left and the only way he wins if the voters do not THINK for themselves or they want to fundamentaly change America
 

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