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Who do you think is some of the best Seedstock producers?

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jigs

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Jigs Creek Herefords ought to be on that list !

(shameless self promoting plug)
 
A

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The N-Bar ranch, when Tom Elliot owned it. Jim Austin was the manager. That was a shame that great old ranch got sold and the cattle let go. They had the whole package. Moderate frame size, calving ease, and carcass among others. They might be a little wilder than some Angus, but the rest made up for it.

Also, our new source for calving ease bulls, but I'm not letting that one out, as they already cost too much without more competition. :D They made my spring pretty easy so far.
 

Shelly

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Crittendon Bros., Imperial, Sask., polled herefords

Johner Stock Farm, Maidstone, Sask., raise herefords and black anguses
 

Brad S

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Our very own Jason Trowbridge is an oldschool breeder. Despite his youth, JT understands Angus pedigrees and performance lineages that epds still can't replicate. I know plenty of good Angus breeders, and epds sure help, but Jason has a chance to be an artist of the breed like Walter Merric is with Quarter Horses.

This board is amazing in that there are some really talented guys willing to share their knowledge. I could name names, but that's not my purpose. But watch what happens when someone asks Jason Trowbridge " my blacks are bred xyz, what do you think about abc breeding exposure."
 

Mike

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"Who do you think is some of the best seedstock producers"

Not being sarcastic at all..............

Best at what? Customer service? Feeding the best bull ration? Best at promotion? Using the best AI Genetics? Best at picking the correct matings for their cowherd? Best at building a sale facility? Best at hiring a herdsman? Best at being a likable guy? Best at getting the bulls ready for the sale?

Having a seedstock producer you trust is the most important thing. Probably the best way to buy a bull is to call that one guy, tell him what kind of calves you want to have, and tell him your price range - then tell him to deliver your new bull - sight unseen. Nobody knows bulls better than the man that raised him cause he knows the cow families. He won't bring you a bad bull because he wants your business next year and the year after. If you don't trust him enough to do that you are dealing with the wrong guy.
 

Aaron

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Good post Mike, agree with you 100%. Trust is #1. I build my customer base one person at a time. First thing out of my mouth is to ask what goals the person has in mind, or what they want to improve in their herd. I am a straight shooter and will let you know if I can supply your needs, and if I can't, I will give you the names of people who can....regardless of their breed...although the Hereford people do tend to get mentioned first. :p Most people either have very vague goals or none at all, so it's usually not hard to please them.
 

Mike

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Aaron said:
Good post Mike, agree with you 100%. Trust is #1. I build my customer base one person at a time. First thing out of my mouth is to ask what goals the person has in mind, or what they want to improve in their herd. I am a straight shooter and will let you know if I can supply your needs, and if I can't, I will give you the names of people who can....regardless of their breed...although the Hereford people do tend to get mentioned first. :p Most people either have very vague goals or none at all, so it's usually not hard to please them.

You got it Aaron-and when you get those calls to deliver those "sight-unseen" bulls, you'll know you're trusted. It will also put you under some awful unecessary pressure. :lol2:
 
A

Anonymous

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the real jake said:
The N-Bar ranch, when Tom Elliot owned it. Jim Austin was the manager. That was a shame that great old ranch got sold and the cattle let go. They had the whole package. Moderate frame size, calving ease, and carcass among others. They might be a little wilder than some Angus, but the rest made up for it.

Also, our new source for calving ease bulls, but I'm not letting that one out, as they already cost too much without more competition. :D They made my spring pretty easy so far.

I have to agree with N-Bar being good usuable cattle- and with the growth extremes that have came about because of the seedstock cattle in the last 10-20 years, I see Larry Leonhardt, Diamond D Angus, and Ohlde Cattle Company coming forward as the top producers of the future... I read the other day where even Gardiner Angus will be using OCC Emblazon in their breeding... A neighbor of mine was at a multi-owner bull test sale today where he said that all the Ohlde influence bred bulls went for over $3000....
 

Faster horses

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I, for one, can really appreciate your post, OT. However, I mentioned Sitz because of the many good Angus cattle out there that carry the Sitz prefix. Would I go to their sale and buy a bull? No. But would I seek out their bloodlines from someone else's herd that I liked the cows? Definitely yes. I think Sitz for one, and Conneally for another, have contributed much to the breed. I'm not crazy about some of the dispositions of Sitz's cattle. In fact the worst disposition bull we ever owned came directly from them. But they do have some really good cattle that you can select with good dispositions. We like to get them from smaller breeders with gentle cows.

I think the moderate frame and easy-fleshing Angus cattle have to be where we are headed next or there is a train wreck ahead. JMHO!!

We know Larry Leonhardt personally and have promoted his cattle, DeBoos and OCC's as well. What about Kit Pharo? He has brought these type of cattle to the forefront with his philosphy.
 

Northern Rancher

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N Bar sure had a nice place for sure-they would of really done the beef business a favour if they'd buried EXT in a big hole then piled rocks on it-can't wait to see the last of those wispy little snakes leave this place lol. Wayne Stevenson was a heck of a cowman too-we lost a heck of a good man there. I'll never forget the time I spent with him looking at cows or quizzing him on the phone-he always had time for you whether your chequebook was big or not.
 

BRG

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No disrespect, but I don't think Kit can be on this list. I think he is going to far the other direction. When you start to promote 2 frame bulls you will loose alot of everything. I am feeding out around 1000 of my customers calves this winter and spring and you need to have performance and a carcass to sell. Angus and Red Angus are already naturally moderate framed. I agree the cattle should be smaller than they have been in the past but his thinking to to extreme.

BRG
 

Jinglebob

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BRG

I ain't arguing with you, but how are you going to breed smaller cattle if you don't use a 2 or 3 frame bull on 4 and 5 frame cows?
 

BRG

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4 to 5 frames cows are small enough. A 4 frame score bull at 12 months old is under 4 feet tall. 47 inches to be exact. With this type of animal the carcass weights are going to be to small. You will also most likely end up having several yield grade 3's and 4's, because they will get to plumpy to fast. I think if we keep our cows around the 1200lb to 1350 lbs(depends on your enviroment) we will keep everyone happy including ourselves. When I say depend on your enviroment, I will give you an example, we purchased a few loads of cattle from a ranch in WY. They were 4 year olds. When they got here they were all 5 frame or under and weighed about 1000lb to1100lbs, in one year they grew a full frame score and they now way 1400+. Some grass just don't let cattle stay that size. But to answer your question, in order to get your cattle smaller will you need that type of bull to do it. The answer is not really. We have found out that with the moderation that the Angus cattle have, red or black, that they will normally be a little smaller than their paernts if their parents are the same size. It is just natural for them to be a little more moderate.
 

Big Muddy rancher

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Would not choosing replacements from the middle of the herd and not the top or biggest hfrs not moderate and even out a cow herd. I know it is hard to disipline ones self not to pick the biggest but I think that leads the herd down the wrong direction.
 

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