• If you are having problems logging in please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the forum page for assistance.

Next HOT breed

Help Support Ranchers.net:

AngusCowBoy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
112
Reaction score
0
Location
ND
What do you think the next hot breed will be and why. I personally think it will be simmentals or red angus. Simmental because of there explosive growth and ability to do it in a somewhat moderate frame along with there hardiness, and red angus because of there hardiness, maternal traits, good growth, and both for good carcasses, and both compliment each other very well.[/b]
 

AngusCowBoy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
112
Reaction score
0
Location
ND
Justin said:
let me ask you this...what is the current hot breed and when did they start?
Right now I would say black angus, not sure when it started as i wasnt around :lol:
 

Justin

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Messages
4,785
Reaction score
0
Location
NW South Dakota
AngusCowBoy said:
Justin said:
let me ask you this...what is the current hot breed and when did they start?
Right now I would say black angus, not sure when it started as i wasnt around :lol:

i would agree and to my knowledge there is no evidence that would suggest that is going to change. :wink:
 

RSL

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 19, 2008
Messages
1,835
Reaction score
0
Location
48 5W4
Interesting. We are seeing huge demand for SM around here, and SMAN cattle. The sale averages are really good for quality cattle. HE may be making a bit of a resurgence. All of this is based around an AN cowherd (or Red Angus).
 

OldDog/NewTricks

Well-known member
Joined
May 24, 2005
Messages
3,443
Reaction score
0
Location
The Dam End of Silicon Valley
Justin said:
AngusCowBoy said:
Justin said:
let me ask you this...what is the current hot breed and when did they start?
Right now I would say black angus, not sure when it started as i wasnt around :lol:

i would agree and to my knowledge there is no evidence that would suggest that is going to change. :wink:

As I recall Angus Breeders got Serious about improving the Breed in the Mid 50's - they did not have to (waist time) Breeding off Horns or make other changes as did other Breeds (±10 years head-start) - I worked for a Ranch that was developing a herd of 5/8's Angus - 3/8's Brahma (Brangus) in 1957 - I helped but together one of the "First Brangus Show Strings"[b/][b/]
 

rancherfred

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Messages
444
Reaction score
0
Location
Western Nebraska
We bought a couple yesterday on the Hale Ranch sale that are moderate framed. The literature said that the entire offering was between 5.5 to 6.2 on frame score. I think that is probably smaller than quite a few Angus cattle. I got a catalog for a Salers sale and they had frame scores up to 7.8. It is hard for me to believe that we are really headed back in that direction.
 

perfecho

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 8, 2009
Messages
133
Reaction score
0
Location
Just south of Edmonton, AB
am starting my LowVieh herd this year...;-) As retirement project, I am likely dispersing my Gelbvieh herd.....best dam cows in my opinion LOL, but going to breed my heifers Lowline. Started with just a few and am very impressed by their toughness and easy fleshing. For pound of feed in and pound out I doubt anything beats them. Supposedly 70% cut ability...will let you know eventually.
This "project" however is for the local market....and I already have customers waiting. If I ever had to put them through an auction market, I would be the one to be "slaughtered!"
 

Soapweed

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Messages
16,257
Reaction score
41
Location
northern Nebraska Sandhills
AngusCowBoy said:
What do you think the next hot breed will be and why.

You could always try a whole different species. Maybe ostriches will make a comeback. There were fortunes made and lost on that game (more lost than gained, I am quite sure).

From an article written January 29, 2001:

http://unlimited.co.nz/unlimited.nsf/default/egg-heads-revenge

There used to be a saying in the ostrich industry: “The sooner we get off the business pages onto the farming pages, the better.” The reference was to the bad press coverage gained from the get-rich-quick operators who swarmed in and out of the high-profile industry, losing a truckload of investors’ money and leaving the real farmers to deal with the fallout.

So what happened to those investors who paid outrageous prices five or six years ago?

Around half are said to have exited the industry, cut their losses and run. Some were lucky enough to have been able to depreciate the birds and charge the tax losses against income. Others lost their life savings. The other half have hung in there, forking out more money for agistment (rearing) fees and waiting for the export market to deliver some return.

“In the old days you could pay $50,000 for a breeding pair, now they are hardly worth catfood,” says Anthony McCullagh, receiver of one of the more recent corporate failures, NZ Ostrich Corp.

That company collapsed in late 1999, owing -investors and others around $1.5 million.
The -receiver said it was a victim of high costs (ostriches eat a lot) but little return (no export market had then been established). By the time the company went belly-up, market prices for its birds were approximately 1% of their value 10 years ago, McCullagh says. Any money recovered will go to company founder Graeme Clegg, who slapped a $1 million debenture over the company 18 months before it collapsed. Investors had less protection.

********************************************************

Or if you just want to farm and not run livestock, maybe something will come along to plant like the Jerusalem Artichoke. :roll:


Pyramid scheme

In the 1980s, the Jerusalem artichoke also gained some notoriety when its seeds were planted by midwestern US farmers at the prodding of an agricultural pyramid scheme. There was little market for the tuber in that part of the US at the time, but farmers were assured it would soon appear on the commodities market. Unfortunately, the only profits were realized by the initial distributors and the first few levels of farmers (who sold their seeds to subsequent levels of the pyramid). As a result, many of the farms which had planted large quantities of the crop were ruined.

**********************************************************

My free advice is to not worry about what the next "hot breed" will be. Find a breed of cattle that already works well, and ride along on the coattails of those who have already put the pavement on the highway to success.
 

leanin' H

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2007
Messages
6,051
Reaction score
372
Location
Western Utah Desert
Whatever works in your area, under your ranching conditions, climate, ect.. will always trump the "Next Hot Breed". My opinion of course. But it seems to me that when we start chasing "fads" wether it be in fashion, music or cattle we end up looking back and wondering how the heck we got where we got! :shock: At the end of the day if your cows raise calves, breed back, stick around awhile and the end result sells well, does it matter what the "experts" are running? And if you enjoy everyday doing it (Or maybe most days), you are living a fine life! Plus you will never find yourself wearing bellbottom plaid cordiroir pants and a checkerboard shirt with collars large enough to get you airborne in a stiff breeze standing in line for a Twisted Sister concert and leading a show steer who's "composite breeding" resulted in 12 foot of leg and 11 feet of back at a handy finish weight of slightly more than Rosie O'donnell after the buffet! :wink:
 

WVGenetics

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 10, 2011
Messages
255
Reaction score
0
Location
West Virginia
leanin' H said:
Whatever works in your area, under your ranching conditions, climate, ect.. will always trump the "Next Hot Breed". My opinion of course. But it seems to me that when we start chasing "fads" wether it be in fashion, music or cattle we end up looking back and wondering how the heck we got where we got! :shock: At the end of the day if your cows raise calves, breed back, stick around awhile and the end result sells well, does it matter what the "experts" are running? And if you enjoy everyday doing it (Or maybe most days), you are living a fine life! Plus you will never find yourself wearing bellbottom plaid cordiroir pants and a checkerboard shirt with collars large enough to get you airborne in a stiff breeze standing in line for a Twisted Sister concert and leading a show steer who's "composite breeding" resulted in 12 foot of leg and 11 feet of back at a handy finish weight of slightly more than Rosie O'donnell after the buffet! :wink:

That's one hell of a sentence, H!
 

leanin' H

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2007
Messages
6,051
Reaction score
372
Location
Western Utah Desert
WVGenetics said:
leanin' H said:
Whatever works in your area, under your ranching conditions, climate, ect.. will always trump the "Next Hot Breed". My opinion of course. But it seems to me that when we start chasing "fads" wether it be in fashion, music or cattle we end up looking back and wondering how the heck we got where we got! :shock: At the end of the day if your cows raise calves, breed back, stick around awhile and the end result sells well, does it matter what the "experts" are running? And if you enjoy everyday doing it (Or maybe most days), you are living a fine life! Plus you will never find yourself wearing bellbottom plaid cordiroir pants and a checkerboard shirt with collars large enough to get you airborne in a stiff breeze standing in line for a Twisted Sister concert and leading a show steer who's "composite breeding" resulted in 12 foot of leg and 11 feet of back at a handy finish weight of slightly more than Rosie O'donnell after the buffet! :wink:

That's one hell of a sentence, H!

I minored in English and majored in falling off bulls/chasing barrell racers/ aluminum beer can recycling/mixed martial arts fighting and tuition spending during my one semester at Southern Utah University! :D Punctuation marks are for sissys! :D Feel free to use me as an example at WV! :shock: :???: :lol:
 

katrina

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 14, 2005
Messages
8,776
Reaction score
2
Location
East north east of Soapweed
leanin' H said:
WVGenetics said:
leanin' H said:
Whatever works in your area, under your ranching conditions, climate, ect.. will always trump the "Next Hot Breed". My opinion of course. But it seems to me that when we start chasing "fads" wether it be in fashion, music or cattle we end up looking back and wondering how the heck we got where we got! :shock: At the end of the day if your cows raise calves, breed back, stick around awhile and the end result sells well, does it matter what the "experts" are running? And if you enjoy everyday doing it (Or maybe most days), you are living a fine life! Plus you will never find yourself wearing bellbottom plaid cordiroir pants and a checkerboard shirt with collars large enough to get you airborne in a stiff breeze standing in line for a Twisted Sister concert and leading a show steer who's "composite breeding" resulted in 12 foot of leg and 11 feet of back at a handy finish weight of slightly more than Rosie O'donnell after the buffet! :wink:

That's one hell of a sentence, H!

I minored in English and majored in falling off bulls/chasing barrell racers/ aluminum beer can recycling/mixed martial arts fighting and tuition spending during my one semester at Southern Utah University! :D Punctuation marks are for sissys! :D Feel free to use me as an example at WV! :shock: :???: :lol:


:D :D :D :D :D
 

andybob

Well-known member
Joined
May 24, 2006
Messages
1,199
Reaction score
16
Location
Fordingbridge England.
I wouldn't wish being "the next hot breed" on any breed as it attracts fly by night breeders who eventually ruin the breed by selling inferior stock the Shorthorn and Hereford are examples of this happening. Different breeds and composites suit different environments and production systems, so the ideal is that there are a larger number of adapted breeds throughout the country, with a lesse number of terminal breeds used to meet market demands out of the adapted breeds.
The problem with other fads such as the ostrich, is that in the context of Africa, there is a ready local market for the meat, export for the leather and feathers, and egg shells to the tourist trade, these markets do not readily export with the stock. I have turned pigs out onto Jerusalem artichokes and finished them with only whey and waste cheese products as a suppliment, there was probably a losy opportunity in the artichoke scam!
 

Big Muddy rancher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
22,120
Reaction score
204
Location
Big Muddy valley
I think i might build a herd of Watusi X Galloway cows.

For a terminal cross I would Breed them EXT and sell the resulting off spring to Gcreek for predator control. :D
 

PATB

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 10, 2009
Messages
571
Reaction score
0
Location
Turner, Maine
Dad planted a 50 fot row of j artichokes in the late 70's from tubers bought at the grocery store. We sold some at the local famer's market but not many. The Artichokes are still growing in the same area after 30 plus years with no intervention or care from me.
 

Latest posts

Top